Fear of Bridges.

I mentioned in the last post my fear of bridges – so now I’m just going to go off on it for a little while here.

I love bridges. Some of my favourite architectural pieces are bridges. In particular, I like brutalist-style concrete spans, particularly if they curve. The stretch of skytrain from Stadium to Main St. is one of my favourite spans anywhere. While incredibly ugly, there is a stark, industrial beauty about a thin slab of cement arcing across my field of vision, thin legs holding this monstrosity up.

Bridges are the ultimate representation of man’s arrogance towards nature. Much more so than a tunnel, that are buried comfortably in the earth. A bridge is left out there for all to see. Driving spikes into a raging river, taunting the force of the water to knock them over. A bridge deck is asking the wind to shake it apart. Connecting disparate pieces of land that Nature has so carefully split apart over the millenia seems foolhardy. Everytime I set foot on a bridge, I see images of it buckling, shaking, tossing all over in the force of an earthquake/hurricane/tornado/etc. Mostly earthquakes, but then I live of the west coast.

Bridges are metaphysical dividers. While it’s no further to walk to broadway than it is to walk to Stanley park, it seem infinitely farther because I must cross a bridge. Moving to the other side of the bridge makes living on ‘the other side’ seem as far away as coquitlam. A bridge is a much larger mental barrier than a door to something. But like a door, a bridge joins, only it can join much more disjointed ideas. It can cross over a large gap to a new train of thought, or a new land. One can never cross a bridge without coming to the brink of something. Something must end before you can get on a bridge, which leaves a discontuity between what you are leaving behind. and what you are heading to.

Bridges are humanized because they age. They also come in breeds and have jobs.

Bridges are some of the few places in a city that one can be truly alone. Stand at the apex of the granville street bridge at 3 in the morning and you’ll know what I mean – you are lost aloft in the air between pockets of civilization. It is dark above and below you. You’ve left the comfort of wherever you are, and are hurrying to wherever it is you’re going.

Oddly enough though, when things aren’t going well for me, I look at bridges as a sign of stability and comfort. As long as the bridge (And it can be any bridge that is part of my life) is standing, then I know things will be ok. Just like now. When I’m on my way home and can see all three bridges connecting to downtown spewing out their blood of cars & exhaust, I know that things are fine.

And that ends this incoherent rambling about bridges

126 Replies to “Fear of Bridges.”

  1. I share your fear of bridges. I’ve had this fear for years now, and I usually have to be asleep to go on long trips. I am fine until I see the bridge. I start shaking, sometimes I cry and I almost always hide my eyes. But always, ALWAYS look over the edge before the end of the bridge. I don’t know what compels me to do it I wish I could just keep them closed. But I never do. Then I picture it. The bridge crumbling below me like a scene from The Mothman Profices. Thats just my take on it. Good luck extingushing your fear!

  2. I share your fear of bridges. I’ve had this fear for years now, and I usually have to be asleep to go on long trips. I am fine until I see the bridge. I start shaking, sometimes I cry and I almost always hide my eyes. But always, ALWAYS look over the edge before the end of the bridge. I don’t know what compels me to do it I wish I could just keep them closed. But I never do. Then I picture it. The bridge crumbling below me like a scene from The Mothman Profices. Thats just my take on it. Good luck extingushing your fear!

  3. Hello,

    I would like to comment that I had a fear of bridges. I’m not quite sure if I still have that fear, because I try to avoid them as much as possible. I know that my fear is lessening, but I’m not quite sure that it has subsided altogether. Just a few years ago, the thought of bridges or the sight of a bridge in the distance would cause me to panic; I couldn’t catch my breath, I would become dizzy, and worst yet, I would have to lie the seat back in order to not see that we were getting ready to cross the bridge. Get this- I wasn’t even the one driving. Once, recently, I did get the courage to drive over a bridge and I had no problem at all. Just the other day I was attempting to driver over a bridge and I “chickened out.” For people who have no fear of bridges, they wouldn’t understand what people who can’t would give to have that freedom. Please, I ask with much seriousness and gratitude, if anyone out there has any information or tips as to how to get over this fear, please post it. Until then I will continue focusing on how to get over my fear 100%. Thanks for your time.

  4. Hello,

    I would like to comment that I had a fear of bridges. I’m not quite sure if I still have that fear, because I try to avoid them as much as possible. I know that my fear is lessening, but I’m not quite sure that it has subsided altogether. Just a few years ago, the thought of bridges or the sight of a bridge in the distance would cause me to panic; I couldn’t catch my breath, I would become dizzy, and worst yet, I would have to lie the seat back in order to not see that we were getting ready to cross the bridge. Get this- I wasn’t even the one driving. Once, recently, I did get the courage to drive over a bridge and I had no problem at all. Just the other day I was attempting to driver over a bridge and I “chickened out.” For people who have no fear of bridges, they wouldn’t understand what people who can’t would give to have that freedom. Please, I ask with much seriousness and gratitude, if anyone out there has any information or tips as to how to get over this fear, please post it. Until then I will continue focusing on how to get over my fear 100%. Thanks for your time.

  5. I’ve just discovered within the past few months that I have a fear of walking across bridges. I guess it was one day this past September, I left my car at home and decided to walk to the convenience store. There is an overpass that spans I-85 below. I stepped on the bridge, and started thinking what if I fell into the path of cars below. I panicked, and walked briskly across the bridge, and was breathing a bit heavily when I got on the other side. Same thing happened on the way back. I laughed at myself, and decided I wasn’t going to walk to the store anymore.

    Fast forward to this week. My car gave out on me, so I have to catch the bus from work. To walk to the bus stop, I have to cross a higher overpass overlooking I-485. I have to run across it, and I have a dizzy feeling as if I’m going to fall. I do everything I can not to look down, because I’d fall for sure if I did that, in my mind that is.

    Gephyrophobia…yep, there’s a name for it according to Google. Good luck to all you guys.

    Paul

  6. I know this isn’t right but I almost feel relieved that others share my fear. My body tends to almost shut down whenever I have to drive over a large bridge. On our way to Florida I encountered the Mississippi River Bridge in Baton Rouge. I was in a position in the road where I could not get off the highway (but believe me I tried I don’t know where I thought I was going though) and thus had to drive over that large bridge. My husband was sleeping in the passenger seat until he heard me squeal and talked me over the bridge. Although, by the time I got across my heart was racing and I thought I was going to pass out. Which passing out on a highway going 60 is not an option. I hate this fear and it seems to be manifesting itself into a fear of overpasses as well. I am searching for cures. thanks!

  7. I know this isn’t right but I almost feel relieved that others share my fear. My body tends to almost shut down whenever I have to drive over a large bridge. On our way to Florida I encountered the Mississippi River Bridge in Baton Rouge. I was in a position in the road where I could not get off the highway (but believe me I tried I don’t know where I thought I was going though) and thus had to drive over that large bridge. My husband was sleeping in the passenger seat until he heard me squeal and talked me over the bridge. Although, by the time I got across my heart was racing and I thought I was going to pass out. Which passing out on a highway going 60 is not an option. I hate this fear and it seems to be manifesting itself into a fear of overpasses as well. I am searching for cures. thanks!

  8. I drove regulary for many years over bridges without any problem until driving over Runcorn bridge in Merseyside UK one night. The fear I have is of driving over the side. I feel that my hands will not respond to steering the car and can visualise going over the edge. Recently, on a way to a football match in Cardiff – I had to drove over the huge Humber bridge. Passengers in the car kept commenting on how huge it was – they could not understand that for me, it was literally walking on a high rise tight rope – without a safety net. Any advice would be welcomed!

  9. I drove regulary for many years over bridges without any problem until driving over Runcorn bridge in Merseyside UK one night. The fear I have is of driving over the side. I feel that my hands will not respond to steering the car and can visualise going over the edge. Recently, on a way to a football match in Cardiff – I had to drove over the huge Humber bridge. Passengers in the car kept commenting on how huge it was – they could not understand that for me, it was literally walking on a high rise tight rope – without a safety net. Any advice would be welcomed!

  10. I have the most incredible fear of crossing a bridge as I approach it. I did not have this fear when I was younger. I find that when I travel
    over a bridge that has only concrete walls, then I feel that I am floating in space. Is it a spacial thing that I have to overcome? When I look over the sides and cannot see anything then I panic.

    Does anyone have any advice for my problem?

    Thanks

    Jim

  11. I have the most incredible fear of crossing a bridge as I approach it. I did not have this fear when I was younger. I find that when I travel
    over a bridge that has only concrete walls, then I feel that I am floating in space. Is it a spacial thing that I have to overcome? When I look over the sides and cannot see anything then I panic.

    Does anyone have any advice for my problem?

    Thanks

    Jim

  12. This is interesting…
    i thought for all this time i was the only one with this ridiculous fear.
    for me, driving over large bridges is torture. i live in Philadelphia, where we have several large bridges that span the Delaware river into New Jersey. well, i am a beach lover, and an avid traveller, so i grin and bear going over those bridges. There is no consistency to it though…
    for instance, we have the Ben Franklin Bridge– a Brooklyn Bridge style type suspension that is monolithic in size and demeanor. i can drive over this bridge with little problem. i think this is the case because it does not have a huge incline going up the span. but more importantly, the sides have a lip to them, kind of enclosing the large wide road that goes across the bridge. i feel safe in there. then there is the Walt Whitman bridge. large, ugly, scary….the incline is high, and it looms with little to stop you from seeing over the edge. i discovered i had my fear one night when i was returning from the shore and i was going up the bridge into Philly and i literally froze. i got dizzy, the vision went blurry and erratic, and i felt as if i was doomed. it was late, and fortunately not many cars on there, so i gunned it and got over it. it was the last time i went over that bridge…i see it every day as sort of an enemy of mine…

    ironically, i love to drive, and travel. i drove x-country twice, and i can tell you every large bridge along I-90, I-80, and I-70 from Philly to Seattle and San Fran. luckily, i have made jokes about my own fear to make it less quirky to my friends and travel companions…but little do they know, they truly petrify me. i dont like any road that goes UP with no sides…i dont like the open space i feel. so i think it might be a fear of open space rather than a fear of bridges perhaps…when i see open space on a road that goes steeply uphill, i panic. its very debilitating.

    its nice to hear i am not the only one. i hope we can all get over this. i am planning driving down to the Outer banks in North Carolina…but i fear the bridges on the way. the Chesapeke Bay Bridge, and the island bridges that i will have to cross. oh well…

  13. This is interesting…
    i thought for all this time i was the only one with this ridiculous fear.
    for me, driving over large bridges is torture. i live in Philadelphia, where we have several large bridges that span the Delaware river into New Jersey. well, i am a beach lover, and an avid traveller, so i grin and bear going over those bridges. There is no consistency to it though…
    for instance, we have the Ben Franklin Bridge– a Brooklyn Bridge style type suspension that is monolithic in size and demeanor. i can drive over this bridge with little problem. i think this is the case because it does not have a huge incline going up the span. but more importantly, the sides have a lip to them, kind of enclosing the large wide road that goes across the bridge. i feel safe in there. then there is the Walt Whitman bridge. large, ugly, scary….the incline is high, and it looms with little to stop you from seeing over the edge. i discovered i had my fear one night when i was returning from the shore and i was going up the bridge into Philly and i literally froze. i got dizzy, the vision went blurry and erratic, and i felt as if i was doomed. it was late, and fortunately not many cars on there, so i gunned it and got over it. it was the last time i went over that bridge…i see it every day as sort of an enemy of mine…

    ironically, i love to drive, and travel. i drove x-country twice, and i can tell you every large bridge along I-90, I-80, and I-70 from Philly to Seattle and San Fran. luckily, i have made jokes about my own fear to make it less quirky to my friends and travel companions…but little do they know, they truly petrify me. i dont like any road that goes UP with no sides…i dont like the open space i feel. so i think it might be a fear of open space rather than a fear of bridges perhaps…when i see open space on a road that goes steeply uphill, i panic. its very debilitating.

    its nice to hear i am not the only one. i hope we can all get over this. i am planning driving down to the Outer banks in North Carolina…but i fear the bridges on the way. the Chesapeke Bay Bridge, and the island bridges that i will have to cross. oh well…

  14. I really appreciate finding this site. I thought I was the only one with fear of bridges. I don’t mind walking over them, even the highest, but I am terror-stricken driving over them. I live on the island of Corsica now where there are few bridges, but originally I’m from Delaware. I could not go to Virginia Beach because of the 20 mile long Chesapeake Bay Bridge/Tunnel. I could not pass over the Delaware Memorial Bridge into New Jersey. But most of all I was terrorized by the other Chesapeake Bay Bridge across the bay into mainland Maryland. All of these bridges still terrify me. I can’t even stand looking at them. When I was young, I had no problems with any of these bridgess. It hit me in my 40s suddenly without warning. On a couple of the bridges I mentioned above, there are people who will drive across for you—so I know I’m not the only one scared. The desensitization does not work for me. I am a total hazard on the road near or on bridges. Are there any other solutions. I am a French citizen now, and I know I will encounter bridges in mainland France. What can I do? I’ve looked at all the advice, and nothing works. I’ll drive 100s of miles to find a ferry. I have lists of ferries all over the US and Europe.

    Joey

  15. I really appreciate finding this site. I thought I was the only one with fear of bridges. I don’t mind walking over them, even the highest, but I am terror-stricken driving over them. I live on the island of Corsica now where there are few bridges, but originally I’m from Delaware. I could not go to Virginia Beach because of the 20 mile long Chesapeake Bay Bridge/Tunnel. I could not pass over the Delaware Memorial Bridge into New Jersey. But most of all I was terrorized by the other Chesapeake Bay Bridge across the bay into mainland Maryland. All of these bridges still terrify me. I can’t even stand looking at them. When I was young, I had no problems with any of these bridgess. It hit me in my 40s suddenly without warning. On a couple of the bridges I mentioned above, there are people who will drive across for you—so I know I’m not the only one scared. The desensitization does not work for me. I am a total hazard on the road near or on bridges. Are there any other solutions. I am a French citizen now, and I know I will encounter bridges in mainland France. What can I do? I’ve looked at all the advice, and nothing works. I’ll drive 100s of miles to find a ferry. I have lists of ferries all over the US and Europe.

    Joey

  16. I really appreciate finding this site. I thought I was the only one with fear of bridges. I don’t mind walking over them, even the highest, but I am terror-stricken driving over them. I live on the island of Corsica now where there are few bridges, but originally I’m from Delaware. I could not go to Virginia Beach because of the 20 mile long Chesapeake Bay Bridge/Tunnel. I could not pass over the Delaware Memorial Bridge into New Jersey. But most of all I was terrorized by the other Chesapeake Bay Bridge across the bay into mainland Maryland. All of these bridges still terrify me. I can’t even stand looking at them. When I was young, I had no problems with any of these bridges. It hit me in my 40s suddenly without warning. On a couple of the bridges I mentioned above, there are people who will drive across for you—so I know I’m not the only one scared. The desensitization does not work for me. I am a total hazard on the road near or on bridges. Are there any other solutions. I am a French citizen now, and I know I will encounter bridges in mainland France. What can I do? I’ve looked at all the advice, and nothing works. I’ll drive 100s of miles to find a ferry. I have lists of ferries all over the US and Europe.

    Joey

  17. I really appreciate finding this site. I thought I was the only one with fear of bridges. I don’t mind walking over them, even the highest, but I am terror-stricken driving over them. I live on the island of Corsica now where there are few bridges, but originally I’m from Delaware. I could not go to Virginia Beach because of the 20 mile long Chesapeake Bay Bridge/Tunnel. I could not pass over the Delaware Memorial Bridge into New Jersey. But most of all I was terrorized by the other Chesapeake Bay Bridge across the bay into mainland Maryland. All of these bridges still terrify me. I can’t even stand looking at them. When I was young, I had no problems with any of these bridges. It hit me in my 40s suddenly without warning. On a couple of the bridges I mentioned above, there are people who will drive across for you—so I know I’m not the only one scared. The desensitization does not work for me. I am a total hazard on the road near or on bridges. Are there any other solutions. I am a French citizen now, and I know I will encounter bridges in mainland France. What can I do? I’ve looked at all the advice, and nothing works. I’ll drive 100s of miles to find a ferry. I have lists of ferries all over the US and Europe.

    Joey

  18. My Mom moved about a year ago. Now, if I want to visit with her, I have to drive over the Tacoma Narrows bridge. I had no fear of bridges until I met this one. Now I have nightmares about driving over it. It goes so high. The lanes feel like they are too narrow for my car. There does not look like there is any safety margin between me and the water that is far below. I had to go over the thing to get home and I was just on the verge of a panic attack as I drove it- as slow as possible though a semi was behind me. I talked myself through and shook, concentrating on staying in my little lane, keeping away from the bit of given bumpy road used for a margin. I always debate whether I would be safer in the lane toward the water or the lane toward oncoming traffic. This bridge is the worst thing that I have encountered in over 20 years of driving. I don’t mind it as much when someone else is doing the driving. I just needed to talk about this. I wish I could drive another way to see my Mom- that would be about another 2 hour detour on a trip that all ready takes around 5 hours. Thanks for listening!

  19. My Mom moved about a year ago. Now, if I want to visit with her, I have to drive over the Tacoma Narrows bridge. I had no fear of bridges until I met this one. Now I have nightmares about driving over it. It goes so high. The lanes feel like they are too narrow for my car. There does not look like there is any safety margin between me and the water that is far below. I had to go over the thing to get home and I was just on the verge of a panic attack as I drove it- as slow as possible though a semi was behind me. I talked myself through and shook, concentrating on staying in my little lane, keeping away from the bit of given bumpy road used for a margin. I always debate whether I would be safer in the lane toward the water or the lane toward oncoming traffic. This bridge is the worst thing that I have encountered in over 20 years of driving. I don’t mind it as much when someone else is doing the driving. I just needed to talk about this. I wish I could drive another way to see my Mom- that would be about another 2 hour detour on a trip that all ready takes around 5 hours. Thanks for listening!

  20. My Mom moved about a year ago. Now, if I want to visit with her, I have to drive over the Tacoma Narrows bridge. I had no fear of bridges until I met this one. Now I have nightmares about driving over it. It goes so high. The lanes feel like they are too narrow for my car. There does not look like there is any safety margin between me and the water that is far below. I had to go over the thing to get home and I was just on the verge of a panic attack as I drove it- as slow as possible though a semi was behind me. I talked myself through and shook, concentrating on staying in my little lane, keeping away from the bit of given bumpy road used for a margin. I always debate whether I would be safer in the lane toward the water or the lane toward oncoming traffic. This bridge is the worst thing that I have encountered in over 20 years of driving. I don’t mind it as much when someone else is doing the driving. I just needed to talk about this. I wish I could drive another way to see my Mom- that would be about another 2 hour detour on a trip that all ready takes around 5 hours. Thanks for listening!

  21. My Mom moved about a year ago. Now, if I want to visit with her, I have to drive over the Tacoma Narrows bridge. I had no fear of bridges until I met this one. Now I have nightmares about driving over it. It goes so high. The lanes feel like they are too narrow for my car. There does not look like there is any safety margin between me and the water that is far below. I had to go over the thing to get home and I was just on the verge of a panic attack as I drove it- as slow as possible though a semi was behind me. I talked myself through and shook, concentrating on staying in my little lane, keeping away from the bit of given bumpy road used for a margin. I always debate whether I would be safer in the lane toward the water or the lane toward oncoming traffic. This bridge is the worst thing that I have encountered in over 20 years of driving. I don’t mind it as much when someone else is doing the driving. I just needed to talk about this. I wish I could drive another way to see my Mom- that would be about another 2 hour detour on a trip that all ready takes around 5 hours. Thanks for listening!

  22. My Mom moved about a year ago. Now, if I want to visit with her, I have to drive over the Tacoma Narrows bridge. I had no fear of bridges until I met this one. Now I have nightmares about driving over it. It goes so high. The lanes feel like they are too narrow for my car. There does not look like there is any safety margin between me and the water that is far below. I had to go over the thing to get home and I was just on the verge of a panic attack as I drove it- as slow as possible though a semi was behind me. I talked myself through and shook, concentrating on staying in my little lane, keeping away from the bit of given bumpy road used for a margin. I always debate whether I would be safer in the lane toward the water or the lane toward oncoming traffic. This bridge is the worst thing that I have encountered in over 20 years of driving. I don’t mind it as much when someone else is doing the driving. I just needed to talk about this. I wish I could drive another way to see my Mom- that would be about another 2 hour detour on a trip that all ready takes around 5 hours. Thanks for listening!

  23. My Mom moved about a year ago. Now, if I want to visit with her, I have to drive over the Tacoma Narrows bridge. I had no fear of bridges until I met this one. Now I have nightmares about driving over it. It goes so high. The lanes feel like they are too narrow for my car. There does not look like there is any safety margin between me and the water that is far below. I had to go over the thing to get home and I was just on the verge of a panic attack as I drove it- as slow as possible though a semi was behind me. I talked myself through and shook, concentrating on staying in my little lane, keeping away from the bit of given bumpy road used for a margin. I always debate whether I would be safer in the lane toward the water or the lane toward oncoming traffic. This bridge is the worst thing that I have encountered in over 20 years of driving. I don’t mind it as much when someone else is doing the driving. I just needed to talk about this. I wish I could drive another way to see my Mom- that would be about another 2 hour detour on a trip that all ready takes around 5 hours. Thanks for listening!

  24. My Mom moved about a year ago. Now, if I want to visit with her, I have to drive over the Tacoma Narrows bridge. I had no fear of bridges until I met this one. Now I have nightmares about driving over it. It goes so high. The lanes feel like they are too narrow for my car. There does not look like there is any safety margin between me and the water that is far below. I had to go over the thing to get home and I was just on the verge of a panic attack as I drove it- as slow as possible though a semi was behind me. I talked myself through and shook, concentrating on staying in my little lane, keeping away from the bit of given bumpy road used for a margin. I always debate whether I would be safer in the lane toward the water or the lane toward oncoming traffic. This bridge is the worst thing that I have encountered in over 20 years of driving. I don’t mind it as much when someone else is doing the driving. I just needed to talk about this. I wish I could drive another way to see my Mom- that would be about another 2 hour detour on a trip that all ready takes around 5 hours. Thanks for listening!

  25. My Mom moved about a year ago. Now, if I want to visit with her, I have to drive over the Tacoma Narrows bridge. I had no fear of bridges until I met this one. Now I have nightmares about driving over it. It goes so high. The lanes feel like they are too narrow for my car. There does not look like there is any safety margin between me and the water that is far below. I had to go over the thing to get home and I was just on the verge of a panic attack as I drove it- as slow as possible though a semi was behind me. I talked myself through and shook, concentrating on staying in my little lane, keeping away from the bit of given bumpy road used for a margin. I always debate whether I would be safer in the lane toward the water or the lane toward oncoming traffic. This bridge is the worst thing that I have encountered in over 20 years of driving. I don’t mind it as much when someone else is doing the driving. I just needed to talk about this. I wish I could drive another way to see my Mom- that would be about another 2 hour detour on a trip that all ready takes around 5 hours. Thanks for listening!

  26. I thought i was the only one with this fear. I live across a 12 mile bridge from my family and i have to cross it every time i go to see them. Every time i am forced to cross it i shake the entire time and i get extremely nervous. I dont like to go visit anymore because i have to cross that horrible bridge. I try to stay in the middle lane so as not to be anywhere near the edge but the bridge is so low that its like driving on the surface. I always picture it just crumbling away…anyways, im glad i found this site, it good to know im not alone.

  27. I thought i was the only one with this fear. I live across a 12 mile bridge from my family and i have to cross it every time i go to see them. Every time i am forced to cross it i shake the entire time and i get extremely nervous. I dont like to go visit anymore because i have to cross that horrible bridge. I try to stay in the middle lane so as not to be anywhere near the edge but the bridge is so low that its like driving on the surface. I always picture it just crumbling away…anyways, im glad i found this site, it good to know im not alone.

  28. I thought i was the only one with this fear. I live across a 12 mile bridge from my family and i have to cross it every time i go to see them. Every time i am forced to cross it i shake the entire time and i get extremely nervous. I dont like to go visit anymore because i have to cross that horrible bridge. I try to stay in the middle lane so as not to be anywhere near the edge but the bridge is so low that its like driving on the surface. I always picture it just crumbling away…anyways, im glad i found this site, it good to know im not alone.

  29. I thought i was the only one with this fear. I live across a 12 mile bridge from my family and i have to cross it every time i go to see them. Every time i am forced to cross it i shake the entire time and i get extremely nervous. I dont like to go visit anymore because i have to cross that horrible bridge. I try to stay in the middle lane so as not to be anywhere near the edge but the bridge is so low that its like driving on the surface. I always picture it just crumbling away…anyways, im glad i found this site, it good to know im not alone.

  30. After reading the comments posted above, all I can say is amen!!! All of this applies to me too. Now instead of trying to drive over these bridges and not getting any better, I’m wondering if we could have some sort of support group. Also, if some of us lived close together by a bridge, maybe it would help to get together and drive over it in the same car. But I don’t know. This is a major problem, and I don’t like those hypnosis and psychotherapy sites that come up when you put fear of bridges in. BTW, just to share, I am an ex-Marine, have seen combat, have seen danger, am masculine, etc. All that crap. But I’m scared to death of driving over bridges. This kind of fear can strike anyone anytime.

  31. After reading the comments posted above, all I can say is amen!!! All of this applies to me too. Now instead of trying to drive over these bridges and not getting any better, I’m wondering if we could have some sort of support group. Also, if some of us lived close together by a bridge, maybe it would help to get together and drive over it in the same car. But I don’t know. This is a major problem, and I don’t like those hypnosis and psychotherapy sites that come up when you put fear of bridges in. BTW, just to share, I am an ex-Marine, have seen combat, have seen danger, am masculine, etc. All that crap. But I’m scared to death of driving over bridges. This kind of fear can strike anyone anytime.

  32. After reading the comments posted above, all I can say is amen!!! All of this applies to me too. Now instead of trying to drive over these bridges and not getting any better, I’m wondering if we could have some sort of support group. Also, if some of us lived close together by a bridge, maybe it would help to get together and drive over it in the same car. But I don’t know. This is a major problem, and I don’t like those hypnosis and psychotherapy sites that come up when you put fear of bridges in. BTW, just to share, I am an ex-Marine, have seen combat, have seen danger, am masculine, etc. All that crap. But I’m scared to death of driving over bridges. This kind of fear can strike anyone anytime.

  33. After reading the comments posted above, all I can say is amen!!! All of this applies to me too. Now instead of trying to drive over these bridges and not getting any better, I’m wondering if we could have some sort of support group. Also, if some of us lived close together by a bridge, maybe it would help to get together and drive over it in the same car. But I don’t know. This is a major problem, and I don’t like those hypnosis and psychotherapy sites that come up when you put fear of bridges in. BTW, just to share, I am an ex-Marine, have seen combat, have seen danger, am masculine, etc. All that crap. But I’m scared to death of driving over bridges. This kind of fear can strike anyone anytime.

  34. add me to the list of people who are glad to hear they’re not alone! i have to drive over the mackinac bridge in about a month, and i’m already freaked. that thing is 5 MILES LONG and so high above the water. just looking at pictures of it makes me dizzy.

  35. add me to the list of people who are glad to hear they’re not alone! i have to drive over the mackinac bridge in about a month, and i’m already freaked. that thing is 5 MILES LONG and so high above the water. just looking at pictures of it makes me dizzy.

  36. I too am afraid of going over bridges. I was fine, went over many bridges, and then one evening I crossed over a very high and narrow bridge and had a panick attack (at least that’s what I imagine a panick attack is.) I felt shaky, dizzy, like I had not control, sweaty, clammy, like I could pass out. It was horrible, especially way up there. I managed to somehow make it over, though I wondered a few times if I would. There was only one lane each direction and cars were coming at me. I drove so slow I know the person behind me must have been aggated. But I couldn’t help it. As soon as I could, I exited the road, got out of the car, and felt so weak I almost fell to the ground. I had a wonderful few days before that at the beach and was all relaxed. I don’t know what caused this but since then the problem has intensified. So much so that I avoid driving anywhere different and worry that around every new corner I will encounter a bridge, an overpass, even anything off the ground these days is a problem. It’s absolutely rediculous and makes me angry! I rationalize that this is rediculous and that there’s no merit to this fear. Yet no matter how much I tell myself these things I find the fear is still there. I have recently been told that it is not good to deal with this alone and to try to continue going over things that scare you. I was told by a counselor today that this is very treatable and I am going to make an appointment tomorrow. I have to get control over this problem because I refuse to let it control me. And it can. I had a situation where I was recently on a long road trip (2800 miles). My son drove and had to swerve to avoid hitting some animal in the road. I happened to be looking down at the time and got very scared. For the next couple of days I was very jittery and my kids couldn’t figure out what was wrong with me. Finally I somewhat calmed down. I felt uneasy being away from home and even more uneasy at the thought of driving the last 800 miles myself once we dropped my son off at college. My other son had just gotten his permit but had never driven on a freeway. I did fine the first 1/2 of the trip until we were almost at my friend’s house. I encountered a high spot in the road and felt the anxiety come back, not as bad as the bridge though. That night we spent the night at a friends and were to finish the rest of the trip the following day. I worried so much about what the road would be like that when we watched a movie that night and saw the Golden Gate Bridge, I actually went into a panic attack and couldn’t sleep for hours!! Incredible!! The next day I knew one of two things was going to happen – my inexperienced son would drive us home (7 hours) or I would have my husband fly out to get me. Now that was rediculous! So my son decided he would drive. OK, I was petrified but he did OK. Every couple of hours we would stop, I would get into the car to drive, go about 1-2 miles, panic, and we’d stop and he’d drive. The poor kid drove the whole way home. It was so stressful for us both. Since then I drive only to and from work – it feels pretty safe but I still don’t feel normal when I drive. I have found that when I’m stressed about anything, small or large, it happens again – not bad, just not the way it used to be. I have high hopes of getting over this quickly and will let you know if I do. Good luck to you all!!

  37. I too am afraid of going over bridges. I was fine, went over many bridges, and then one evening I crossed over a very high and narrow bridge and had a panick attack (at least that’s what I imagine a panick attack is.) I felt shaky, dizzy, like I had not control, sweaty, clammy, like I could pass out. It was horrible, especially way up there. I managed to somehow make it over, though I wondered a few times if I would. There was only one lane each direction and cars were coming at me. I drove so slow I know the person behind me must have been aggated. But I couldn’t help it. As soon as I could, I exited the road, got out of the car, and felt so weak I almost fell to the ground. I had a wonderful few days before that at the beach and was all relaxed. I don’t know what caused this but since then the problem has intensified. So much so that I avoid driving anywhere different and worry that around every new corner I will encounter a bridge, an overpass, even anything off the ground these days is a problem. It’s absolutely rediculous and makes me angry! I rationalize that this is rediculous and that there’s no merit to this fear. Yet no matter how much I tell myself these things I find the fear is still there. I have recently been told that it is not good to deal with this alone and to try to continue going over things that scare you. I was told by a counselor today that this is very treatable and I am going to make an appointment tomorrow. I have to get control over this problem because I refuse to let it control me. And it can. I had a situation where I was recently on a long road trip (2800 miles). My son drove and had to swerve to avoid hitting some animal in the road. I happened to be looking down at the time and got very scared. For the next couple of days I was very jittery and my kids couldn’t figure out what was wrong with me. Finally I somewhat calmed down. I felt uneasy being away from home and even more uneasy at the thought of driving the last 800 miles myself once we dropped my son off at college. My other son had just gotten his permit but had never driven on a freeway. I did fine the first 1/2 of the trip until we were almost at my friend’s house. I encountered a high spot in the road and felt the anxiety come back, not as bad as the bridge though. That night we spent the night at a friends and were to finish the rest of the trip the following day. I worried so much about what the road would be like that when we watched a movie that night and saw the Golden Gate Bridge, I actually went into a panic attack and couldn’t sleep for hours!! Incredible!! The next day I knew one of two things was going to happen – my inexperienced son would drive us home (7 hours) or I would have my husband fly out to get me. Now that was rediculous! So my son decided he would drive. OK, I was petrified but he did OK. Every couple of hours we would stop, I would get into the car to drive, go about 1-2 miles, panic, and we’d stop and he’d drive. The poor kid drove the whole way home. It was so stressful for us both. Since then I drive only to and from work – it feels pretty safe but I still don’t feel normal when I drive. I have found that when I’m stressed about anything, small or large, it happens again – not bad, just not the way it used to be. I have high hopes of getting over this quickly and will let you know if I do. Good luck to you all!!

  38. I too am afraid of going over bridges. I was fine, went over many bridges, and then one evening I crossed over a very high and narrow bridge and had a panick attack (at least that’s what I imagine a panick attack is.) I felt shaky, dizzy, like I had not control, sweaty, clammy, like I could pass out. It was horrible, especially way up there. I managed to somehow make it over, though I wondered a few times if I would. There was only one lane each direction and cars were coming at me. I drove so slow I know the person behind me must have been aggated. But I couldn’t help it. As soon as I could, I exited the road, got out of the car, and felt so weak I almost fell to the ground. I had a wonderful few days before that at the beach and was all relaxed. I don’t know what caused this but since then the problem has intensified. So much so that I avoid driving anywhere different and worry that around every new corner I will encounter a bridge, an overpass, even anything off the ground these days is a problem. It’s absolutely rediculous and makes me angry! I rationalize that this is rediculous and that there’s no merit to this fear. Yet no matter how much I tell myself these things I find the fear is still there. I have recently been told that it is not good to deal with this alone and to try to continue going over things that scare you. I was told by a counselor today that this is very treatable and I am going to make an appointment tomorrow. I have to get control over this problem because I refuse to let it control me. And it can. I had a situation where I was recently on a long road trip (2800 miles). My son drove and had to swerve to avoid hitting some animal in the road. I happened to be looking down at the time and got very scared. For the next couple of days I was very jittery and my kids couldn’t figure out what was wrong with me. Finally I somewhat calmed down. I felt uneasy being away from home and even more uneasy at the thought of driving the last 800 miles myself once we dropped my son off at college. My other son had just gotten his permit but had never driven on a freeway. I did fine the first 1/2 of the trip until we were almost at my friend’s house. I encountered a high spot in the road and felt the anxiety come back, not as bad as the bridge though. That night we spent the night at a friends and were to finish the rest of the trip the following day. I worried so much about what the road would be like that when we watched a movie that night and saw the Golden Gate Bridge, I actually went into a panic attack and couldn’t sleep for hours!! Incredible!! The next day I knew one of two things was going to happen – my inexperienced son would drive us home (7 hours) or I would have my husband fly out to get me. Now that was rediculous! So my son decided he would drive. OK, I was petrified but he did OK. Every couple of hours we would stop, I would get into the car to drive, go about 1-2 miles, panic, and we’d stop and he’d drive. The poor kid drove the whole way home. It was so stressful for us both. Since then I drive only to and from work – it feels pretty safe but I still don’t feel normal when I drive. I have found that when I’m stressed about anything, small or large, it happens again – not bad, just not the way it used to be. I have high hopes of getting over this quickly and will let you know if I do. Good luck to you all!!

  39. I too am afraid of going over bridges. I was fine, went over many bridges, and then one evening I crossed over a very high and narrow bridge and had a panick attack (at least that’s what I imagine a panick attack is.) I felt shaky, dizzy, like I had not control, sweaty, clammy, like I could pass out. It was horrible, especially way up there. I managed to somehow make it over, though I wondered a few times if I would. There was only one lane each direction and cars were coming at me. I drove so slow I know the person behind me must have been aggated. But I couldn’t help it. As soon as I could, I exited the road, got out of the car, and felt so weak I almost fell to the ground. I had a wonderful few days before that at the beach and was all relaxed. I don’t know what caused this but since then the problem has intensified. So much so that I avoid driving anywhere different and worry that around every new corner I will encounter a bridge, an overpass, even anything off the ground these days is a problem. It’s absolutely rediculous and makes me angry! I rationalize that this is rediculous and that there’s no merit to this fear. Yet no matter how much I tell myself these things I find the fear is still there. I have recently been told that it is not good to deal with this alone and to try to continue going over things that scare you. I was told by a counselor today that this is very treatable and I am going to make an appointment tomorrow. I have to get control over this problem because I refuse to let it control me. And it can. I had a situation where I was recently on a long road trip (2800 miles). My son drove and had to swerve to avoid hitting some animal in the road. I happened to be looking down at the time and got very scared. For the next couple of days I was very jittery and my kids couldn’t figure out what was wrong with me. Finally I somewhat calmed down. I felt uneasy being away from home and even more uneasy at the thought of driving the last 800 miles myself once we dropped my son off at college. My other son had just gotten his permit but had never driven on a freeway. I did fine the first 1/2 of the trip until we were almost at my friend’s house. I encountered a high spot in the road and felt the anxiety come back, not as bad as the bridge though. That night we spent the night at a friends and were to finish the rest of the trip the following day. I worried so much about what the road would be like that when we watched a movie that night and saw the Golden Gate Bridge, I actually went into a panic attack and couldn’t sleep for hours!! Incredible!! The next day I knew one of two things was going to happen – my inexperienced son would drive us home (7 hours) or I would have my husband fly out to get me. Now that was rediculous! So my son decided he would drive. OK, I was petrified but he did OK. Every couple of hours we would stop, I would get into the car to drive, go about 1-2 miles, panic, and we’d stop and he’d drive. The poor kid drove the whole way home. It was so stressful for us both. Since then I drive only to and from work – it feels pretty safe but I still don’t feel normal when I drive. I have found that when I’m stressed about anything, small or large, it happens again – not bad, just not the way it used to be. I have high hopes of getting over this quickly and will let you know if I do. Good luck to you all!!

  40. Can anyone explain how the therapy works? I have the problem discussed above about crossing bridges big time.

  41. Can anyone explain how the therapy works? I have the problem discussed above about crossing bridges big time.

  42. I am so glad to see that others share with me that one certain “fear”. Mine started in 1981 when I had won an Elvis Look Alike contest in Little Rock and the prize was three days/two nights in Memphis. My wife and I started our journey out of the state (less than a couple of hours) and was really excited. She was eight months pregnant and I had never won anything like a contest before. Going from Arkansas to Tennessee you have two options; I 40 or old Hwy 55 and unfortunately that day I opted to drive Hwy 55. Coming into Memphis, I suddenly saw the iron works of the old bridge and for some reason my heart started racing, palms started sweating and just as I got to the start of the bridge, I slammed my brakes, put the car in park and opted to walk across. My wife actually thought I was having a heartattack and I thought, after we both got across (she driving and me walking), she was going into labor because of the trauma. From that time forward, my fear is not of bridges over water, but bridges with overhead spans over water. I now work in Little Rock and have to drive across the Arkansas River bridge daily which does not bother me. But to go to Memphis (because of my “other” job), it still unnerves me to start the cross even on the I-40 bridge even though by the time you reach the middle of the bridge you are already over half the Mississippi River and starting your decent into Memphis. When I actually sat down and thought about why this probably affected me so, I remember a time in my youth when we would go to my grandmother’s house and there was an old span bridge that crossed a small creek and the boards that held this bridge together were in bad repair. As a young boy, I had read stories in the newspaper where cars had went off the bridge in the middle of the night and the next morning, there were no survivors. As my father would cross the bridge, I would get down in the floorboard and listen until I could no longer hear the bridge rumble under the wheels. This is the only thing I could think of that would have made me apprehensive about this. The odd thing about this, I am very comfortable when someone else is driving. When I do finally make those trips to Memphis or wherever and encounter bridges, I actually go into a routine of changing radio stations, lighting up a cigarette or simply try to ignore the fact of what I am about to do.
    Don’t know whether that would help others and it is very distressing when you are planning trips and the first thing you look for is how many bodies of water you are going to encounter.

    Good luck to all

  43. I am so glad to see that others share with me that one certain “fear”. Mine started in 1981 when I had won an Elvis Look Alike contest in Little Rock and the prize was three days/two nights in Memphis. My wife and I started our journey out of the state (less than a couple of hours) and was really excited. She was eight months pregnant and I had never won anything like a contest before. Going from Arkansas to Tennessee you have two options; I 40 or old Hwy 55 and unfortunately that day I opted to drive Hwy 55. Coming into Memphis, I suddenly saw the iron works of the old bridge and for some reason my heart started racing, palms started sweating and just as I got to the start of the bridge, I slammed my brakes, put the car in park and opted to walk across. My wife actually thought I was having a heartattack and I thought, after we both got across (she driving and me walking), she was going into labor because of the trauma. From that time forward, my fear is not of bridges over water, but bridges with overhead spans over water. I now work in Little Rock and have to drive across the Arkansas River bridge daily which does not bother me. But to go to Memphis (because of my “other” job), it still unnerves me to start the cross even on the I-40 bridge even though by the time you reach the middle of the bridge you are already over half the Mississippi River and starting your decent into Memphis. When I actually sat down and thought about why this probably affected me so, I remember a time in my youth when we would go to my grandmother’s house and there was an old span bridge that crossed a small creek and the boards that held this bridge together were in bad repair. As a young boy, I had read stories in the newspaper where cars had went off the bridge in the middle of the night and the next morning, there were no survivors. As my father would cross the bridge, I would get down in the floorboard and listen until I could no longer hear the bridge rumble under the wheels. This is the only thing I could think of that would have made me apprehensive about this. The odd thing about this, I am very comfortable when someone else is driving. When I do finally make those trips to Memphis or wherever and encounter bridges, I actually go into a routine of changing radio stations, lighting up a cigarette or simply try to ignore the fact of what I am about to do.
    Don’t know whether that would help others and it is very distressing when you are planning trips and the first thing you look for is how many bodies of water you are going to encounter.

    Good luck to all

  44. I am so glad to see that others share with me that one certain “fear”. Mine started in 1981 when I had won an Elvis Look Alike contest in Little Rock and the prize was three days/two nights in Memphis. My wife and I started our journey out of the state (less than a couple of hours) and was really excited. She was eight months pregnant and I had never won anything like a contest before. Going from Arkansas to Tennessee you have two options; I 40 or old Hwy 55 and unfortunately that day I opted to drive Hwy 55. Coming into Memphis, I suddenly saw the iron works of the old bridge and for some reason my heart started racing, palms started sweating and just as I got to the start of the bridge, I slammed my brakes, put the car in park and opted to walk across. My wife actually thought I was having a heartattack and I thought, after we both got across (she driving and me walking), she was going into labor because of the trauma. From that time forward, my fear is not of bridges over water, but bridges with overhead spans over water. I now work in Little Rock and have to drive across the Arkansas River bridge daily which does not bother me. But to go to Memphis (because of my “other” job), it still unnerves me to start the cross even on the I-40 bridge even though by the time you reach the middle of the bridge you are already over half the Mississippi River and starting your decent into Memphis. When I actually sat down and thought about why this probably affected me so, I remember a time in my youth when we would go to my grandmother’s house and there was an old span bridge that crossed a small creek and the boards that held this bridge together were in bad repair. As a young boy, I had read stories in the newspaper where cars had went off the bridge in the middle of the night and the next morning, there were no survivors. As my father would cross the bridge, I would get down in the floorboard and listen until I could no longer hear the bridge rumble under the wheels. This is the only thing I could think of that would have made me apprehensive about this. The odd thing about this, I am very comfortable when someone else is driving. When I do finally make those trips to Memphis or wherever and encounter bridges, I actually go into a routine of changing radio stations, lighting up a cigarette or simply try to ignore the fact of what I am about to do.
    Don’t know whether that would help others and it is very distressing when you are planning trips and the first thing you look for is how many bodies of water you are going to encounter.

    Good luck to all

  45. I am so glad to see that others share with me that one certain “fear”. Mine started in 1981 when I had won an Elvis Look Alike contest in Little Rock and the prize was three days/two nights in Memphis. My wife and I started our journey out of the state (less than a couple of hours) and was really excited. She was eight months pregnant and I had never won anything like a contest before. Going from Arkansas to Tennessee you have two options; I 40 or old Hwy 55 and unfortunately that day I opted to drive Hwy 55. Coming into Memphis, I suddenly saw the iron works of the old bridge and for some reason my heart started racing, palms started sweating and just as I got to the start of the bridge, I slammed my brakes, put the car in park and opted to walk across. My wife actually thought I was having a heartattack and I thought, after we both got across (she driving and me walking), she was going into labor because of the trauma. From that time forward, my fear is not of bridges over water, but bridges with overhead spans over water. I now work in Little Rock and have to drive across the Arkansas River bridge daily which does not bother me. But to go to Memphis (because of my “other” job), it still unnerves me to start the cross even on the I-40 bridge even though by the time you reach the middle of the bridge you are already over half the Mississippi River and starting your decent into Memphis. When I actually sat down and thought about why this probably affected me so, I remember a time in my youth when we would go to my grandmother’s house and there was an old span bridge that crossed a small creek and the boards that held this bridge together were in bad repair. As a young boy, I had read stories in the newspaper where cars had went off the bridge in the middle of the night and the next morning, there were no survivors. As my father would cross the bridge, I would get down in the floorboard and listen until I could no longer hear the bridge rumble under the wheels. This is the only thing I could think of that would have made me apprehensive about this. The odd thing about this, I am very comfortable when someone else is driving. When I do finally make those trips to Memphis or wherever and encounter bridges, I actually go into a routine of changing radio stations, lighting up a cigarette or simply try to ignore the fact of what I am about to do.
    Don’t know whether that would help others and it is very distressing when you are planning trips and the first thing you look for is how many bodies of water you are going to encounter.

    Good luck to all

  46. Hi All, About ten years ago driving across one of the bridges over San Francisco Bay, I had my first panic attach. Thank goodness someone was in the car to talk me over. Since then, I frequently think about future crossings and I get really nervous, although I just recently drove over a bridge that spans the Saint Lawrence River. Next week I am going to Florida and I need to cross Tampa Bay, not once, but twice on different bridges. One is The Sunshine Skyway Bridge which is 4.23 miles in length and 190 feet high, the other is the Gandy Bridge which is 2.6 miles in length. I am scared to death and am trying to talk myself into being OK. I know I can do this, but boy am I nervous,. Thanks for reading. Hope we all conquer.

  47. Hi All, About ten years ago driving across one of the bridges over San Francisco Bay, I had my first panic attach. Thank goodness someone was in the car to talk me over. Since then, I frequently think about future crossings and I get really nervous, although I just recently drove over a bridge that spans the Saint Lawrence River. Next week I am going to Florida and I need to cross Tampa Bay, not once, but twice on different bridges. One is The Sunshine Skyway Bridge which is 4.23 miles in length and 190 feet high, the other is the Gandy Bridge which is 2.6 miles in length. I am scared to death and am trying to talk myself into being OK. I know I can do this, but boy am I nervous,. Thanks for reading. Hope we all conquer.

  48. My fear of bridges developed in my forties; I am also afraid of driving down mountain roads in rainy weather or in winter. It is a crippling situation, I have to visit my family and end up driving to find “flat” bridges or ferries, taking much longer. Driving in bridge lanes farthest from the edge sometimes helps a little, as well as estimating how many seconds the trip across the bridge is and counting as I drive. The problem is compounded by my husband’s fast and impatient driving. I panic days and miles in advance of a bridge. This fear is truly a handicap. Any suggestions???

  49. My fear of bridges developed in my forties; I am also afraid of driving down mountain roads in rainy weather or in winter. It is a crippling situation, I have to visit my family and end up driving to find “flat” bridges or ferries, taking much longer. Driving in bridge lanes farthest from the edge sometimes helps a little, as well as estimating how many seconds the trip across the bridge is and counting as I drive. The problem is compounded by my husband’s fast and impatient driving. I panic days and miles in advance of a bridge. This fear is truly a handicap. Any suggestions???

  50. I had no idea so many others share my intense and debilitating fear of bridges! I find some comfort in that. Everyone who knows me is aware of this fear. I take huge pride in the fact that I do drive over the bridges, but I fear every second that I am going to plunge over the side. I have no idea why i have this fear but i have been aware of it since my teens and i am in my 40’s now. I do everything possible to avoid bridges if I can,and I have noticed that it is only bridges over water that petrify me, not bridges over land (such as interstate overpasses etc. no matter how high they are). A few times I have asked to ride with others when I know i am going to have to travel over a bridge because the anticipation of having to go over the bridge is so paralyzing i know i won’t be able to do it that day. But most of the time i find a way to get across. This has taken quite a toll on my daily life and i wish i had some insight to how to get over it. Help!

  51. I had no idea so many others share my intense and debilitating fear of bridges! I find some comfort in that. Everyone who knows me is aware of this fear. I take huge pride in the fact that I do drive over the bridges, but I fear every second that I am going to plunge over the side. I have no idea why i have this fear but i have been aware of it since my teens and i am in my 40’s now. I do everything possible to avoid bridges if I can,and I have noticed that it is only bridges over water that petrify me, not bridges over land (such as interstate overpasses etc. no matter how high they are). A few times I have asked to ride with others when I know i am going to have to travel over a bridge because the anticipation of having to go over the bridge is so paralyzing i know i won’t be able to do it that day. But most of the time i find a way to get across. This has taken quite a toll on my daily life and i wish i had some insight to how to get over it. Help!

  52. I am so glad to hear Lenore’s comment about the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. I have never liked driving it and when I am really stressed my anxiety about it skyrockets. I had a 10 panic attack on it last March and have only driven it a few times since. I have been taking the bus to work. Please let me know your progress Lenore. I would like a buddy to compare notes with.

  53. I am so glad to hear Lenore’s comment about the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. I have never liked driving it and when I am really stressed my anxiety about it skyrockets. I had a 10 panic attack on it last March and have only driven it a few times since. I have been taking the bus to work. Please let me know your progress Lenore. I would like a buddy to compare notes with.

  54. I’ve always been afraid of driving over bridges, and as I’ve gotten older, it’s gotten worse! Now I CAN’T drive over bridges at all. I live in Kansas City, MO but north of the Missouri River. That means that I can’t go downtown, to the stadiums, to the Plaza, nothing. Recently I’ve also become afraid to drive on highways. I’m totally dependent on my husband and friends. My husband came home last night and said that he had a panic attack driving over a bridge! Now what are we going to do??? Hopefully his was just a one time thing!!!!!

  55. I’ve always been afraid of driving over bridges, and as I’ve gotten older, it’s gotten worse! Now I CAN’T drive over bridges at all. I live in Kansas City, MO but north of the Missouri River. That means that I can’t go downtown, to the stadiums, to the Plaza, nothing. Recently I’ve also become afraid to drive on highways. I’m totally dependent on my husband and friends. My husband came home last night and said that he had a panic attack driving over a bridge! Now what are we going to do??? Hopefully his was just a one time thing!!!!!

  56. I am terrified of bridges! I honestly thought I was the only one with this unique fear, and all of my friends always laugh at me and joke about it, so I was so relieved to find this web site. I read that everyone has similiar feelings about bridges, but I was wondering if anyone had figured out ways to overcome it it. If anyone has any ideas to help with the situation, please email it to me at lilcuty83@aol.com. Also, I saw someone wrote something about a therapy for the fear, if there is any information on that, please email me that too, Thank you!

  57. I am terrified of bridges! I honestly thought I was the only one with this unique fear, and all of my friends always laugh at me and joke about it, so I was so relieved to find this web site. I read that everyone has similiar feelings about bridges, but I was wondering if anyone had figured out ways to overcome it it. If anyone has any ideas to help with the situation, please email it to me at lilcuty83@aol.com. Also, I saw someone wrote something about a therapy for the fear, if there is any information on that, please email me that too, Thank you!

  58. I am terrified of bridges! I honestly thought I was the only one with this unique fear, and all of my friends always laugh at me and joke about it, so I was so relieved to find this web site. I read that everyone has similiar feelings about bridges, but I was wondering if anyone had figured out ways to overcome it it. If anyone has any ideas to help with the situation, please email it to me at lilcuty83@aol.com. Also, I saw someone wrote something about a therapy for the fear, if there is any information on that, please email me that too, Thank you!

  59. I am terrified of bridges! I honestly thought I was the only one with this unique fear, and all of my friends always laugh at me and joke about it, so I was so relieved to find this web site. I read that everyone has similiar feelings about bridges, but I was wondering if anyone had figured out ways to overcome it it. If anyone has any ideas to help with the situation, please email it to me at lilcuty83@aol.com. Also, I saw someone wrote something about a therapy for the fear, if there is any information on that, please email me that too, Thank you!

  60. I am terrified of bridges! I honestly thought I was the only one with this unique fear, and all of my friends always laugh at me and joke about it, so I was so relieved to find this web site. I read that everyone has similiar feelings about bridges, but I was wondering if anyone had figured out ways to overcome it it. If anyone has any ideas to help with the situation, please email it to me at lilcuty83@aol.com. Also, I saw someone wrote something about a therapy for the fear, if there is any information on that, please email me that too, Thank you!

  61. I am terrified of bridges! I honestly thought I was the only one with this unique fear, and all of my friends always laugh at me and joke about it, so I was so relieved to find this web site. I read that everyone has similiar feelings about bridges, but I was wondering if anyone had figured out ways to overcome it it. If anyone has any ideas to help with the situation, please email it to me at lilcuty83@aol.com. Also, I saw someone wrote something about a therapy for the fear, if there is any information on that, please email me that too, Thank you!

  62. I am terrified of bridges! I honestly thought I was the only one with this unique fear, and all of my friends always laugh at me and joke about it, so I was so relieved to find this web site. I read that everyone has similiar feelings about bridges, but I was wondering if anyone had figured out ways to overcome it it. If anyone has any ideas to help with the situation, please email it to me at lilcuty83@aol.com. Also, I saw someone wrote something about a therapy for the fear, if there is any information on that, please email me that too, Thank you!

  63. I am terrified of bridges! I honestly thought I was the only one with this unique fear, and all of my friends always laugh at me and joke about it, so I was so relieved to find this web site. I read that everyone has similiar feelings about bridges, but I was wondering if anyone had figured out ways to overcome it it. If anyone has any ideas to help with the situation, please email it to me at lilcuty83@aol.com. Also, I saw someone wrote something about a therapy for the fear, if there is any information on that, please email me that too, Thank you!

  64. I never realized this phobia was so common. I have a friend, Danielle, who is terrified of walking across bridges with me. I always thought it was rather peculiar, but I hope they find a cure for it. If she finds herself on a bridge without knwoing, she starts hyperventilating.

    -Blaire

  65. I never realized this phobia was so common. I have a friend, Danielle, who is terrified of walking across bridges with me. I always thought it was rather peculiar, but I hope they find a cure for it. If she finds herself on a bridge without knwoing, she starts hyperventilating.

    -Blaire

  66. My husband is scared to death crossing a bridge over water. He does imagine he will turn the wheel and the car and him will fall into the water.One time someone was driving and they were going to the FL Keys. He kept his head down and shut his eyes closed throughout all those bridges. Glad I stumbled across this site. I hate it for him. I wish there was something I could do. Good Luck to you all.

  67. My husband is scared to death crossing a bridge over water. He does imagine he will turn the wheel and the car and him will fall into the water.One time someone was driving and they were going to the FL Keys. He kept his head down and shut his eyes closed throughout all those bridges. Glad I stumbled across this site. I hate it for him. I wish there was something I could do. Good Luck to you all.

  68. My husband is scared to death crossing a bridge over water. He does imagine he will turn the wheel and the car and him will fall into the water.One time someone was driving and they were going to the FL Keys. He kept his head down and shut his eyes closed throughout all those bridges. Glad I stumbled across this site. I hate it for him. I wish there was something I could do. Good Luck to you all.

  69. My husband is scared to death crossing a bridge over water. He does imagine he will turn the wheel and the car and him will fall into the water.One time someone was driving and they were going to the FL Keys. He kept his head down and shut his eyes closed throughout all those bridges. Glad I stumbled across this site. I hate it for him. I wish there was something I could do. Good Luck to you all.

  70. A POSSIBLE SOLUTION: The Anxiety & Phobia Workbook, Third Edition, by Bourne, Ph.D., Edmund J. Copyright 2000 by New Harbinger Publications, Inc.
    I developed this fear in the spring of 2001 and it got worse. I went to a psychiatrist for a year and because I didn’t know it was the open space on some bridges, I talked about a general fear of heights. It did get better, he rode with me across bridges and if I practice driving across the bridges I do desensitize myself to them. It’s the unknown or known tall bridges with lots of open space that bother me. I have the panic attack where my heart is racing, I’m sweating, shaking and (from therapy) found I was holding my breath–which on a long bridge WILL cause to me pass out–which is what I panic about in the first place–not being able to make it across. I’m not worried about the bridge collapsing, I’m worried about me staying conscious enough to finish driving over it. Well, I decided enough is enough and got The Anxiety & Phobia Workbook yesterday. It makes sense so far–of course it’s for other anxieties and phobias as well, but it’s got some great insight for me. If any of you have tried it or do try it, please let me know how it goes–bfarriscgtc@yahoo.com! I know we can ALL learn to drive across bridges again.

  71. A POSSIBLE SOLUTION: The Anxiety & Phobia Workbook, Third Edition, by Bourne, Ph.D., Edmund J. Copyright 2000 by New Harbinger Publications, Inc.
    I developed this fear in the spring of 2001 and it got worse. I went to a psychiatrist for a year and because I didn’t know it was the open space on some bridges, I talked about a general fear of heights. It did get better, he rode with me across bridges and if I practice driving across the bridges I do desensitize myself to them. It’s the unknown or known tall bridges with lots of open space that bother me. I have the panic attack where my heart is racing, I’m sweating, shaking and (from therapy) found I was holding my breath–which on a long bridge WILL cause to me pass out–which is what I panic about in the first place–not being able to make it across. I’m not worried about the bridge collapsing, I’m worried about me staying conscious enough to finish driving over it. Well, I decided enough is enough and got The Anxiety & Phobia Workbook yesterday. It makes sense so far–of course it’s for other anxieties and phobias as well, but it’s got some great insight for me. If any of you have tried it or do try it, please let me know how it goes–bfarriscgtc@yahoo.com! I know we can ALL learn to drive across bridges again.

  72. i cant believe i found this site! i was actually laughing with relief that other people know what im going through. the fear of bridges really took hold in my 40’s. the delaware memorial i simply cant do. my husband drives over it and thinks im nuts with the reaction i have. the bridge is a horror. the height and little protection from going over the side, what were the engineers thinking? i can do the top of the george washington with out too much of a problem. i dont like the lower level. i want help for this also, its such an embarassment to live with, and it puts such limitations on your life. im not sure if its height, or the insecurity of possibly going over, but id sure like to know how i got it. dyan

  73. i cant believe i found this site! i was actually laughing with relief that other people know what im going through. the fear of bridges really took hold in my 40’s. the delaware memorial i simply cant do. my husband drives over it and thinks im nuts with the reaction i have. the bridge is a horror. the height and little protection from going over the side, what were the engineers thinking? i can do the top of the george washington with out too much of a problem. i dont like the lower level. i want help for this also, its such an embarassment to live with, and it puts such limitations on your life. im not sure if its height, or the insecurity of possibly going over, but id sure like to know how i got it. dyan

  74. i cant believe i found this site! i was actually laughing with relief that other people know what im going through. the fear of bridges really took hold in my 40’s. the delaware memorial i simply cant do. my husband drives over it and thinks im nuts with the reaction i have. the bridge is a horror. the height and little protection from going over the side, what were the engineers thinking? i can do the top of the george washington with out too much of a problem. i dont like the lower level. i want help for this also, its such an embarassment to live with, and it puts such limitations on your life. im not sure if its height, or the insecurity of possibly going over, but id sure like to know how i got it. dyan

  75. i cant believe i found this site! i was actually laughing with relief that other people know what im going through. the fear of bridges really took hold in my 40’s. the delaware memorial i simply cant do. my husband drives over it and thinks im nuts with the reaction i have. the bridge is a horror. the height and little protection from going over the side, what were the engineers thinking? i can do the top of the george washington with out too much of a problem. i dont like the lower level. i want help for this also, its such an embarassment to live with, and it puts such limitations on your life. im not sure if its height, or the insecurity of possibly going over, but id sure like to know how i got it. dyan

  76. I recently thought of a way to ease my bridge-crossing anxiety and would like to share my story with everyone (incidentally, a similar approach helped me quit smoking after 16 years last March 2002).

    About 6 months ago I discovered a fear of bridges. Not all bridges, (so far) just ones that are peaked in the center. (also The Skyway, which runs through downtown Buffalo) Here in Western New York, we have two pairs of “peaked” bridges strung across the Niagara River as part of I-190, each with an arched roadway. One pair is at the south end of Grand Island, one pair at the north. Each bridge has two lanes going the same direction. I have a problem when I cant see the end of the bridge (or down). As soon as I reach the peak and can see the end, I get much better, but on the way up I fear Im going to steer off the edge, or that the bridge has collapsed and I cant see it past the peak. It actually helps if I can see down to the water, but being 55 MPH and only two lanes wide with no shoulders I dont dare look. Knowing the bridge is very high, but not seeing exactly how high, I have the impression it is the highest bridge in the world. I try to focus on the road directly ahead, but the bridges are so narrow I can see the water below on both sides of me with my peripheral vision, giving me a sense of unknown height. By the time I get halfway to the peak of the bridge Im just about ready to stop the car. I have no sense of direction by this point, the world swirling around me. The bottom quite drops out of my stomach. This same feeling on an amusement park ride would feel great, but Im driving several hundred feet above the Niagara River with nothing but a 3″ dia steel rail between me and certain death. Im certain I would be able to handle the drive if I was a passenger, as my fear is of steering over the edge due to my loss of orientation, and not the height.

    I do not want to give in to this fear, so I soldier on, thinking it is a miracle every time I go over these bridges. I know it is irresponsible of me to do this with my wife and child in the car, but I am always certain I can do it, right up to the point where I start the uphill climb. Then I feel the dizziness hit me like a wave. I know I wont actually drive off the edge, because the worse I feel, the slower I go. If I get too bad, I will just stop and let my wife drive us the rest of the way. This, of course, would cause a traffic nightmare, and just the thought of drawing that kind of attention to myself keeps me pushing on.

    Realizing my fear is all in my head, and seeing everybody else make the crossing as if it were nothing encouraged me to force the issue and try to beat this thing. (Let’s hear it for peer pressure!) After all, for the past 18 years these bridges, and others like them gave me the biggest thrill. Now, the feeling is the same; I just react differently to it. My approach was this: I will always feel disorientated, like I am floating, crossing these bridges. I will accept this as a fact of life. So, knowing it is only a sensation made up in my head, I wont try to ignore it, but I will learn to function normally in spite of it. I got in my car alone and with $4.00 in quarters for toll drove to the south bridges. These were easier for me because they have a framework above the roadway making me feel a little more secure. Paying my toll I passed the point of no return. Feeling the floating sensation come upon me, I didnt try to fight it off; I embraced it. I glanced around me on the way up, seeing everything. Believing the feeling wasnt real made it easier to perceive the reality of what was happening: I was just driving up a normal hill, on a normal road that just happened to be over the river. I wasnt swerving the way I felt I was; that was in my head. I just calmly steered the wheel, actuated the gas pedal and checked my surroundings the way I always do anywhere else I drive. The only difference was the floating sensation, which at its worst could never make me loose control of my arms and legs all by itself. I flexed them occasionally just to test their movements against the sensation. Before I knew it, I was at the top, looking down at Grand Island and the end of the bridge. I exited the Interstate at my first opportunity and turned right around to cross back over to the mainland. This second crossing was much milder than the previous. Turning around again, I crossed back over to the island to continue on I-190N to Niagara Falls and the north Grand Island bridges. These were always worse than the south bridges because there is nothing but open sky over you. They also seem a bit steeper. Having believed I found a way to function in spite of the feeling, I crossed with only a mild sensation. As on the south bridges, I turned around and crossed again. No problem. Crossing a third time, I headed back home.

    My solution to my fear of bridges is to accept the feeling of floating for what it is: only a feeling, accentuated by the stress of fear. I didn not try to suppress or ignore it. I just dealt with the situation of driving. Period. Not fearing the floating feeling made it substantially less. Granted, this is a very difficult thing to do. Preparing to go, I had chickened out after thinking my way over the bridge. I was certain I could not do it. After 15 minutes I changed my mind again and just left. Even then, I almost turned off the highway just before the bridge, but I threw my hat over the fence by passing thru the tollbooth, committing me to my plan. I know that some crossings will be better than others, but knowing I have complete control of the vehicle in spite of the way I feel takes away a lot of the stress.

    Sorry to run on about this so long, I just hate to have anything hold me down and this bridge thing was getting to be a serious problem. I feel my method could work for anyone posting to this site. Im not a writer, so please excuse the poor structure of this post, and if I repeated myself at all, it is only because I wanted to make sure I was clear enough.

    Charlie.

  77. I recently thought of a way to ease my bridge-crossing anxiety and would like to share my story with everyone (incidentally, a similar approach helped me quit smoking after 16 years last March 2002).

    About 6 months ago I discovered a fear of bridges. Not all bridges, (so far) just ones that are peaked in the center. (also The Skyway, which runs through downtown Buffalo) Here in Western New York, we have two pairs of “peaked” bridges strung across the Niagara River as part of I-190, each with an arched roadway. One pair is at the south end of Grand Island, one pair at the north. Each bridge has two lanes going the same direction. I have a problem when I cant see the end of the bridge (or down). As soon as I reach the peak and can see the end, I get much better, but on the way up I fear Im going to steer off the edge, or that the bridge has collapsed and I cant see it past the peak. It actually helps if I can see down to the water, but being 55 MPH and only two lanes wide with no shoulders I dont dare look. Knowing the bridge is very high, but not seeing exactly how high, I have the impression it is the highest bridge in the world. I try to focus on the road directly ahead, but the bridges are so narrow I can see the water below on both sides of me with my peripheral vision, giving me a sense of unknown height. By the time I get halfway to the peak of the bridge Im just about ready to stop the car. I have no sense of direction by this point, the world swirling around me. The bottom quite drops out of my stomach. This same feeling on an amusement park ride would feel great, but Im driving several hundred feet above the Niagara River with nothing but a 3″ dia steel rail between me and certain death. Im certain I would be able to handle the drive if I was a passenger, as my fear is of steering over the edge due to my loss of orientation, and not the height.

    I do not want to give in to this fear, so I soldier on, thinking it is a miracle every time I go over these bridges. I know it is irresponsible of me to do this with my wife and child in the car, but I am always certain I can do it, right up to the point where I start the uphill climb. Then I feel the dizziness hit me like a wave. I know I wont actually drive off the edge, because the worse I feel, the slower I go. If I get too bad, I will just stop and let my wife drive us the rest of the way. This, of course, would cause a traffic nightmare, and just the thought of drawing that kind of attention to myself keeps me pushing on.

    Realizing my fear is all in my head, and seeing everybody else make the crossing as if it were nothing encouraged me to force the issue and try to beat this thing. (Let’s hear it for peer pressure!) After all, for the past 18 years these bridges, and others like them gave me the biggest thrill. Now, the feeling is the same; I just react differently to it. My approach was this: I will always feel disorientated, like I am floating, crossing these bridges. I will accept this as a fact of life. So, knowing it is only a sensation made up in my head, I wont try to ignore it, but I will learn to function normally in spite of it. I got in my car alone and with $4.00 in quarters for toll drove to the south bridges. These were easier for me because they have a framework above the roadway making me feel a little more secure. Paying my toll I passed the point of no return. Feeling the floating sensation come upon me, I didnt try to fight it off; I embraced it. I glanced around me on the way up, seeing everything. Believing the feeling wasnt real made it easier to perceive the reality of what was happening: I was just driving up a normal hill, on a normal road that just happened to be over the river. I wasnt swerving the way I felt I was; that was in my head. I just calmly steered the wheel, actuated the gas pedal and checked my surroundings the way I always do anywhere else I drive. The only difference was the floating sensation, which at its worst could never make me loose control of my arms and legs all by itself. I flexed them occasionally just to test their movements against the sensation. Before I knew it, I was at the top, looking down at Grand Island and the end of the bridge. I exited the Interstate at my first opportunity and turned right around to cross back over to the mainland. This second crossing was much milder than the previous. Turning around again, I crossed back over to the island to continue on I-190N to Niagara Falls and the north Grand Island bridges. These were always worse than the south bridges because there is nothing but open sky over you. They also seem a bit steeper. Having believed I found a way to function in spite of the feeling, I crossed with only a mild sensation. As on the south bridges, I turned around and crossed again. No problem. Crossing a third time, I headed back home.

    My solution to my fear of bridges is to accept the feeling of floating for what it is: only a feeling, accentuated by the stress of fear. I didn not try to suppress or ignore it. I just dealt with the situation of driving. Period. Not fearing the floating feeling made it substantially less. Granted, this is a very difficult thing to do. Preparing to go, I had chickened out after thinking my way over the bridge. I was certain I could not do it. After 15 minutes I changed my mind again and just left. Even then, I almost turned off the highway just before the bridge, but I threw my hat over the fence by passing thru the tollbooth, committing me to my plan. I know that some crossings will be better than others, but knowing I have complete control of the vehicle in spite of the way I feel takes away a lot of the stress.

    Sorry to run on about this so long, I just hate to have anything hold me down and this bridge thing was getting to be a serious problem. I feel my method could work for anyone posting to this site. Im not a writer, so please excuse the poor structure of this post, and if I repeated myself at all, it is only because I wanted to make sure I was clear enough.

    Charlie.

  78. Until today I didn’t know my fear had a name. I assumed there were others who shared my fear but not this many. Mine is not as sever as some. I can drive over most brideges(I think) I don’t live where there are very many and I can avoid almost all of them. My Fear seems to be more generalized. I fear most man made structures. Anything with large amounts of concrete and steel.(Add the fact that I have a fear of heights (very minor) and “vertigo”) My greatest fear of this is a dam. I can’t even look at them in pictures. I can’t drive over them and if I am a passanger I have to keep my eyes closed until I get to the other side. I count the joints that connect the sections of road over the damn (or bridge) that way when I have to cross I don’t have to relie on someone to tell me I am over it. I can sometimes look at a bridge once Ive crossed it but never a dam. So far I have noticed that this fear extends to (at top of the list) dams, bridges,tall buildings (over 4 stories), basements or concrete tunnels (these are treated the same as dams) NOw if I can concentrate on my driving (over bridges) and keep the radio on I don’t think about it as much but by the time I get to the oter side my heart rate and b/p are up and my breathing is rapid. MY ultimate fear: a tunnel that runs through a dam and you can see the water on one side and the steel/concrete of the dam on the other. AHHHHHH lol 🙂

  79. Until today I didn’t know my fear had a name. I assumed there were others who shared my fear but not this many. Mine is not as sever as some. I can drive over most brideges(I think) I don’t live where there are very many and I can avoid almost all of them. My Fear seems to be more generalized. I fear most man made structures. Anything with large amounts of concrete and steel.(Add the fact that I have a fear of heights (very minor) and “vertigo”) My greatest fear of this is a dam. I can’t even look at them in pictures. I can’t drive over them and if I am a passanger I have to keep my eyes closed until I get to the other side. I count the joints that connect the sections of road over the damn (or bridge) that way when I have to cross I don’t have to relie on someone to tell me I am over it. I can sometimes look at a bridge once Ive crossed it but never a dam. So far I have noticed that this fear extends to (at top of the list) dams, bridges,tall buildings (over 4 stories), basements or concrete tunnels (these are treated the same as dams) NOw if I can concentrate on my driving (over bridges) and keep the radio on I don’t think about it as much but by the time I get to the oter side my heart rate and b/p are up and my breathing is rapid. MY ultimate fear: a tunnel that runs through a dam and you can see the water on one side and the steel/concrete of the dam on the other. AHHHHHH lol 🙂

  80. Until today I didn’t know my fear had a name. I assumed there were others who shared my fear but not this many. Mine is not as sever as some. I can drive over most brideges(I think) I don’t live where there are very many and I can avoid almost all of them. My Fear seems to be more generalized. I fear most man made structures. Anything with large amounts of concrete and steel.(Add the fact that I have a fear of heights (very minor) and “vertigo”) My greatest fear of this is a dam. I can’t even look at them in pictures. I can’t drive over them and if I am a passanger I have to keep my eyes closed until I get to the other side. I count the joints that connect the sections of road over the damn (or bridge) that way when I have to cross I don’t have to relie on someone to tell me I am over it. I can sometimes look at a bridge once Ive crossed it but never a dam. So far I have noticed that this fear extends to (at top of the list) dams, bridges,tall buildings (over 4 stories), basements or concrete tunnels (these are treated the same as dams) NOw if I can concentrate on my driving (over bridges) and keep the radio on I don’t think about it as much but by the time I get to the oter side my heart rate and b/p are up and my breathing is rapid. MY ultimate fear: a tunnel that runs through a dam and you can see the water on one side and the steel/concrete of the dam on the other. AHHHHHH lol 🙂

  81. Until today I didn’t know my fear had a name. I assumed there were others who shared my fear but not this many. Mine is not as sever as some. I can drive over most brideges(I think) I don’t live where there are very many and I can avoid almost all of them. My Fear seems to be more generalized. I fear most man made structures. Anything with large amounts of concrete and steel.(Add the fact that I have a fear of heights (very minor) and “vertigo”) My greatest fear of this is a dam. I can’t even look at them in pictures. I can’t drive over them and if I am a passanger I have to keep my eyes closed until I get to the other side. I count the joints that connect the sections of road over the damn (or bridge) that way when I have to cross I don’t have to relie on someone to tell me I am over it. I can sometimes look at a bridge once Ive crossed it but never a dam. So far I have noticed that this fear extends to (at top of the list) dams, bridges,tall buildings (over 4 stories), basements or concrete tunnels (these are treated the same as dams) NOw if I can concentrate on my driving (over bridges) and keep the radio on I don’t think about it as much but by the time I get to the oter side my heart rate and b/p are up and my breathing is rapid. MY ultimate fear: a tunnel that runs through a dam and you can see the water on one side and the steel/concrete of the dam on the other. AHHHHHH lol 🙂

  82. hi everyone my name is britney I’m only fourteen and litlly terrafide of crossing bridges when I was five I was pushed off a bridge and all most drowned and I used to live in a small town and a bridge fell there and I thought I was going to die I have also seen a profacie I swear I’d I hope someone can help me please email me at britneyc162002@yahoo.ca
    thank you bye

  83. hi everyone my name is britney I’m only fourteen and litlly terrafide of crossing bridges when I was five I was pushed off a bridge and all most drowned and I used to live in a small town and a bridge fell there and I thought I was going to die I have also seen a profacie I swear I’d I hope someone can help me please email me at britneyc162002@yahoo.ca
    thank you bye

  84. Add another person to the group. My fear began sometime in my thirties. I am now 45 and still battling this problem. From what I can trace, my problem started on a vacation trip to ocean City Maryland. The route takes us through the Lehigh Tunnel. It’s about a mile long with two lanes and no room to pull off. It’s a trapped feeling.I have to pull over before entering the tunnel and wait until traffic is clear. I then go as quickly (and safely) as possible. The entire time my Heart is racing. I’m literally trembling and I’m breathing like I’m running. It is an awful experience and worse because my Family is with me. I see them as being very calm and I’m sure they cannot understand why I have this problem. I thought that this problem was confined to tunnels but to my delight, it happened when I saw and then went over two bridges, One on rte 301 from Virginia to Maryland. This thing was like going up a roller coaster. Two lanes,straight up with low rails over water,very high. I could not believe that someone would build a bridge in this manner. I made it over but then encountered an even higher bridge rte 50 Chesapeke Bay Bridge Maryland. I couldn’t believe this one. I could see other drivers casually going over the bridge with one hand on the wheel like it was nothing. This really makes you feel like a wimp. Well the saga continues as the other day I was driving up a very steep long hill in upstate NY. The same feeling started. I barely made it. I have tried to analyze the problem and find that something is triggered when I’m on a steep incline and also when I’m somewhere where there does not appear to be an escape. I have been diagnosed as having MVP (mitral valve prolapse) I have visited several sites that suggest Panic attacks are triggered by this (leaky heart valve). My Doctor is not sold on that idea and feels I have a Panic Disorder. Like everyone else I’m looking for help. God Bless us all, every one.

  85. Add another person to the group. My fear began sometime in my thirties. I am now 45 and still battling this problem. From what I can trace, my problem started on a vacation trip to ocean City Maryland. The route takes us through the Lehigh Tunnel. It’s about a mile long with two lanes and no room to pull off. It’s a trapped feeling.I have to pull over before entering the tunnel and wait until traffic is clear. I then go as quickly (and safely) as possible. The entire time my Heart is racing. I’m literally trembling and I’m breathing like I’m running. It is an awful experience and worse because my Family is with me. I see them as being very calm and I’m sure they cannot understand why I have this problem. I thought that this problem was confined to tunnels but to my delight, it happened when I saw and then went over two bridges, One on rte 301 from Virginia to Maryland. This thing was like going up a roller coaster. Two lanes,straight up with low rails over water,very high. I could not believe that someone would build a bridge in this manner. I made it over but then encountered an even higher bridge rte 50 Chesapeke Bay Bridge Maryland. I couldn’t believe this one. I could see other drivers casually going over the bridge with one hand on the wheel like it was nothing. This really makes you feel like a wimp. Well the saga continues as the other day I was driving up a very steep long hill in upstate NY. The same feeling started. I barely made it. I have tried to analyze the problem and find that something is triggered when I’m on a steep incline and also when I’m somewhere where there does not appear to be an escape. I have been diagnosed as having MVP (mitral valve prolapse) I have visited several sites that suggest Panic attacks are triggered by this (leaky heart valve). My Doctor is not sold on that idea and feels I have a Panic Disorder. Like everyone else I’m looking for help. God Bless us all, every one.

  86. that I am not the only one who has a fear of high bridges helps. I am not sure when this fear started, but it became bad enough to where I would avoid high bridges when possible. The bridges I hate are the ones that go waaaay up. I know the bridges Tom is referring to and I also ask the same question… what were the designers thinking?!? Don’t they know the high bridges make some people uncomfortable?? Going down the other side is a snap because I am almost done then. It is just the going up part I don’t like. I don’t even know why. Maybe it is a trapped feeling of being committed once I start up. That’s it! It’s a fear of relationships that’s causing this! 🙂

    I am by no means an expert on phobias, but when I cross a bridge I don’t like crossing, I try not to view crossing an entire bridge. I simply pick sections out up ahead as I am driving over it such as a lamppost, and I tell myself, I just need to make it that far. Then I am there and I pick out my next landmark. And before I know it, I am over the bridge. Naturally you have to keep your eye on traffic while you are driving, but you can engage yourself in an activity such as making it to the next landmark. I have also counted the seconds it takes to go over a bridge (one thousand one, one thousand two, etc.). Again, it occupied my time and I wasn’t as scared. Taking a deep breath before starting and breathing and concentrating on breathing normally helps too.

    One long bridge I used to pass over daily sometimes stacks up with traffic during rush hour. I kept a book or a correspondence course with me to work on while I was sitting in traffic on that bridge. This really helped. I also realized that there were a lot of other people in cars around me and many of them were just as scared. Still, we all got through it okay.

    Finally, the calming power of prayer has helped enormously. I have whispered the 23rd Psalm to myself and Philippians 4:13 I can do everything through him who gives me strength.(NIV) before and during going over a bridge. Knowing that God actually cares about me getting over the bridge is a great motivator.

    Hope that helps!

  87. that I am not the only one who has a fear of high bridges helps. I am not sure when this fear started, but it became bad enough to where I would avoid high bridges when possible. The bridges I hate are the ones that go waaaay up. I know the bridges Tom is referring to and I also ask the same question… what were the designers thinking?!? Don’t they know the high bridges make some people uncomfortable?? Going down the other side is a snap because I am almost done then. It is just the going up part I don’t like. I don’t even know why. Maybe it is a trapped feeling of being committed once I start up. That’s it! It’s a fear of relationships that’s causing this! 🙂

    I am by no means an expert on phobias, but when I cross a bridge I don’t like crossing, I try not to view crossing an entire bridge. I simply pick sections out up ahead as I am driving over it such as a lamppost, and I tell myself, I just need to make it that far. Then I am there and I pick out my next landmark. And before I know it, I am over the bridge. Naturally you have to keep your eye on traffic while you are driving, but you can engage yourself in an activity such as making it to the next landmark. I have also counted the seconds it takes to go over a bridge (one thousand one, one thousand two, etc.). Again, it occupied my time and I wasn’t as scared. Taking a deep breath before starting and breathing and concentrating on breathing normally helps too.

    One long bridge I used to pass over daily sometimes stacks up with traffic during rush hour. I kept a book or a correspondence course with me to work on while I was sitting in traffic on that bridge. This really helped. I also realized that there were a lot of other people in cars around me and many of them were just as scared. Still, we all got through it okay.

    Finally, the calming power of prayer has helped enormously. I have whispered the 23rd Psalm to myself and Philippians 4:13 I can do everything through him who gives me strength.(NIV) before and during going over a bridge. Knowing that God actually cares about me getting over the bridge is a great motivator.

    Hope that helps!

  88. i developed my fear of heights in my early thirties. before that time i had driven over various bridges, including the Golden Gate and Bay Bridge in California with no problems. however, this time i approached a bridge in lower Maryland and i felt my entire body tense up. i proceeded slowly over the bridge but my hands were locked on the steering wheel, palms sweating profusely, and my heart began to race. it was all in my power to make myself continue to drive; i had slowed down to an almost stop with people behind me honking and getting very aggravated. since that time i avoid bridges if at all possible or have someone else drive. however, i like to travel and would love to overcome this fear.

  89. i developed my fear of heights in my early thirties. before that time i had driven over various bridges, including the Golden Gate and Bay Bridge in California with no problems. however, this time i approached a bridge in lower Maryland and i felt my entire body tense up. i proceeded slowly over the bridge but my hands were locked on the steering wheel, palms sweating profusely, and my heart began to race. it was all in my power to make myself continue to drive; i had slowed down to an almost stop with people behind me honking and getting very aggravated. since that time i avoid bridges if at all possible or have someone else drive. however, i like to travel and would love to overcome this fear.

  90. i developed my fear of heights in my early thirties. before that time i had driven over various bridges, including the Golden Gate and Bay Bridge in California with no problems. however, this time i approached a bridge in lower Maryland and i felt my entire body tense up. i proceeded slowly over the bridge but my hands were locked on the steering wheel, palms sweating profusely, and my heart began to race. it was all in my power to make myself continue to drive; i had slowed down to an almost stop with people behind me honking and getting very aggravated. since that time i avoid bridges if at all possible or have someone else drive. however, i like to travel and would love to overcome this fear.

  91. i developed my fear of heights in my early thirties. before that time i had driven over various bridges, including the Golden Gate and Bay Bridge in California with no problems. however, this time i approached a bridge in lower Maryland and i felt my entire body tense up. i proceeded slowly over the bridge but my hands were locked on the steering wheel, palms sweating profusely, and my heart began to race. it was all in my power to make myself continue to drive; i had slowed down to an almost stop with people behind me honking and getting very aggravated. since that time i avoid bridges if at all possible or have someone else drive. however, i like to travel and would love to overcome this fear.

  92. I have had a fear of bridges since my early 20’s, maybe longer. I am terrified of the “going up” part of the bridge, the open area. If I were to get on a roller coaster, I would be terrified of the part of the ride where you are going up, but not at all afraid of the part of the ride where you are going down. I have had nightmares (recurring) of driving along and finding myself at the foot of a bridge at night. The bridge is all lit up, glowing, all the cars have their lights on, its as if the bridge is this big, white glowing thing in contrast to the black night around it, and I am at the foot of the bridge and I don’t want to get on it, but there is no way to get off. This dream terrifies me. I have to go to work everday in Wilmington, Delaware from the Eastern Shore of Maryland. I must cross over the Chesapeake and Delaware canal (which is a very deep man-made canal), and I have a choice of 3 bridges to go over it. At this point, there is only one bridge which I can minimally handle, the Summit Bridge, and that’s because it isn’t quite so steep an incline, and it has a little bit of a railing on the sides. Even so, I have panic 2’xs a day every day driving over it, and I usually hit the pedal and exceed 70 mph over the bridge just to get it over with. I know it sounds nuts, but now, I have to wear my leather gloves whenever I go over the bridge (my hands sweat from fear when I drive over), and I panic if I can’t find my gloves. I think the fear is of losing control — and driving over the edge — but I think the fear starts somewhere else in your life and translates to the bridge thing. I realized that when I was going through extreme stress in my life, the bridge fear became extreme as well. Its like someone who had to maintain control over things, i.e., someone who grew up in a situation that needed to be controlled (children of alcoholics, etc.)facing the fear of “what if something can’t be controlled?”. Its like, if you can’t control the situation, you may die, you may go over the bridge. Basically, as a child in a violent alcoholic family, if you couldn’t control the situation, or if the situation were out of control, you feared you might die.

    I don’t know, maybe this is all just a bunch of bull, but now they are getting ready to do construction on the one bridge I can seem to drive over (not easily) to get to work, and I don’t know what I’m going to do if I have to drive in the outside lane (near the edge), or if the traffic is backed up & I have to sit on the bridge. This is really impacting on my ability to live — I really am not sure I can drive to work once this construction starts, and I don’t know how I’ll get there unless I do.

    I tried to go to a psychologist once for help, but he wanted to start in on all the childhood background stuff, & I had already gone through that with other psychologists over many years, and didn’t want to open all that up again. I just wanted someone to help me to get over this fear so that I can drive to work without suffering through panic attacks twice a day, so I can maybe drive to New York to see my sisters if I want to, so I won’t be enslaved by this fear. Is there any way to get help for this now, and not have to be dragged through therapy for God knows how long?

  93. I have had a fear of bridges since my early 20’s, maybe longer. I am terrified of the “going up” part of the bridge, the open area. If I were to get on a roller coaster, I would be terrified of the part of the ride where you are going up, but not at all afraid of the part of the ride where you are going down. I have had nightmares (recurring) of driving along and finding myself at the foot of a bridge at night. The bridge is all lit up, glowing, all the cars have their lights on, its as if the bridge is this big, white glowing thing in contrast to the black night around it, and I am at the foot of the bridge and I don’t want to get on it, but there is no way to get off. This dream terrifies me. I have to go to work everday in Wilmington, Delaware from the Eastern Shore of Maryland. I must cross over the Chesapeake and Delaware canal (which is a very deep man-made canal), and I have a choice of 3 bridges to go over it. At this point, there is only one bridge which I can minimally handle, the Summit Bridge, and that’s because it isn’t quite so steep an incline, and it has a little bit of a railing on the sides. Even so, I have panic 2’xs a day every day driving over it, and I usually hit the pedal and exceed 70 mph over the bridge just to get it over with. I know it sounds nuts, but now, I have to wear my leather gloves whenever I go over the bridge (my hands sweat from fear when I drive over), and I panic if I can’t find my gloves. I think the fear is of losing control — and driving over the edge — but I think the fear starts somewhere else in your life and translates to the bridge thing. I realized that when I was going through extreme stress in my life, the bridge fear became extreme as well. Its like someone who had to maintain control over things, i.e., someone who grew up in a situation that needed to be controlled (children of alcoholics, etc.)facing the fear of “what if something can’t be controlled?”. Its like, if you can’t control the situation, you may die, you may go over the bridge. Basically, as a child in a violent alcoholic family, if you couldn’t control the situation, or if the situation were out of control, you feared you might die.

    I don’t know, maybe this is all just a bunch of bull, but now they are getting ready to do construction on the one bridge I can seem to drive over (not easily) to get to work, and I don’t know what I’m going to do if I have to drive in the outside lane (near the edge), or if the traffic is backed up & I have to sit on the bridge. This is really impacting on my ability to live — I really am not sure I can drive to work once this construction starts, and I don’t know how I’ll get there unless I do.

    I tried to go to a psychologist once for help, but he wanted to start in on all the childhood background stuff, & I had already gone through that with other psychologists over many years, and didn’t want to open all that up again. I just wanted someone to help me to get over this fear so that I can drive to work without suffering through panic attacks twice a day, so I can maybe drive to New York to see my sisters if I want to, so I won’t be enslaved by this fear. Is there any way to get help for this now, and not have to be dragged through therapy for God knows how long?

  94. Sorry, when I posted my earlier message, I was so eager to talk to other people with this fear of bridges that I forgot to add my info.

    Frankly, I’ve achieved a lot in my life in spit of my lot in life, but I’m being crippled by this fear of bridges. Thoughts of having to drive over the bridge, the conditions which might exist on the bridge, etc. rule my life.

    I really don’t have a problem being a passenger in a car going over a bridge (for the most part), in fact he first time I realized I had this fear was when I was +/-28 & was driving my daughter & her friend to girl scout camp over the Chesapeake City Bridge. This is a very steep (high span) bridge, and as I started to go over, it felt as if someone poured acid in the middle of my skull. This feeling just hit me, and as much as I wanted to get over the bridge as quickly as possible, my foot wouldn’t press down on the accelerator, so I ended up going slower than I wanted to. I asked the girls to sing something to take my mind off of the situation, & I did (of course) get over the bridge & get the girls to camp. The problem was, I had to cross over again, by myself, to get back home. Believe me, I thought of just putting down routes on the other side of that bridge, because I sure didn’t want to cross it again, but somehow I did.

    I think the person who said that the high “peak” of the bridge was more of the problem than the bridge itself was right. I drove over the “Hatem River” bridge in Cecil County, MD many times & was fine. Its basically a high, flat bridge, but it does have a high arched peak. One day I was taking the dogs to the vet & had to drive over it (its a mile + long) & I thought I would pass out & go over the edge. It didn’t help that there’s a “Jersey Wall” separating the east & westbound lanes. By the time I got to the vet (about 6 miles after the bridge) my hands were still shaking enough that the vet remarked about it. I had to call someone to come & get me, because there was no way I was going to be able to get over that bridge again.

    Its strange, but I go through periods where I’m not as afraid of bridges, but then it seems to start up all over again. Desensitization has no meaning, I could cross a bridge a million times and be ok, and then inexplicably, on the millionth and first time, totally freak out. I’m going to try to “work through the feeling” as suggested in an earlier email on this site, but would welcome any other help out there.

  95. Sorry, when I posted my earlier message, I was so eager to talk to other people with this fear of bridges that I forgot to add my info.

    Frankly, I’ve achieved a lot in my life in spit of my lot in life, but I’m being crippled by this fear of bridges. Thoughts of having to drive over the bridge, the conditions which might exist on the bridge, etc. rule my life.

    I really don’t have a problem being a passenger in a car going over a bridge (for the most part), in fact he first time I realized I had this fear was when I was +/-28 & was driving my daughter & her friend to girl scout camp over the Chesapeake City Bridge. This is a very steep (high span) bridge, and as I started to go over, it felt as if someone poured acid in the middle of my skull. This feeling just hit me, and as much as I wanted to get over the bridge as quickly as possible, my foot wouldn’t press down on the accelerator, so I ended up going slower than I wanted to. I asked the girls to sing something to take my mind off of the situation, & I did (of course) get over the bridge & get the girls to camp. The problem was, I had to cross over again, by myself, to get back home. Believe me, I thought of just putting down routes on the other side of that bridge, because I sure didn’t want to cross it again, but somehow I did.

    I think the person who said that the high “peak” of the bridge was more of the problem than the bridge itself was right. I drove over the “Hatem River” bridge in Cecil County, MD many times & was fine. Its basically a high, flat bridge, but it does have a high arched peak. One day I was taking the dogs to the vet & had to drive over it (its a mile + long) & I thought I would pass out & go over the edge. It didn’t help that there’s a “Jersey Wall” separating the east & westbound lanes. By the time I got to the vet (about 6 miles after the bridge) my hands were still shaking enough that the vet remarked about it. I had to call someone to come & get me, because there was no way I was going to be able to get over that bridge again.

    Its strange, but I go through periods where I’m not as afraid of bridges, but then it seems to start up all over again. Desensitization has no meaning, I could cross a bridge a million times and be ok, and then inexplicably, on the millionth and first time, totally freak out. I’m going to try to “work through the feeling” as suggested in an earlier email on this site, but would welcome any other help out there.

  96. Steve, are you Russian? My son is a Russian linguist, who studied at the DLI & I work with a very interesting woman who moved to the US from Russia.

  97. Steve, are you Russian? My son is a Russian linguist, who studied at the DLI & I work with a very interesting woman who moved to the US from Russia.

  98. Hi Connie (& everyone else)..

    No, I’m not russian. I do however quite like the Soviet Realist style of art & design, and that influenced the look of this site.

  99. Hi Connie (& everyone else)..

    No, I’m not russian. I do however quite like the Soviet Realist style of art & design, and that influenced the look of this site.

  100. I cannot walk over Brooklyn Bridge. Boardwalk style of walkway fears me. I can see though below my feet to the water below. spaciba

  101. I cannot walk over Brooklyn Bridge. Boardwalk style of walkway fears me. I can see though below my feet to the water below. spaciba

  102. It has been awhile since I have been to this site.
    The list of bridges you are provideing helps to know where to avoid when I travel LOL 🙂

    I use to live in San Diego. The Coronado Bay bridge is to be avoided if you can Not only is it high and has low rails along the side but it curves and tilts as you go over it. My greatest fear was getting stuck in traffic and being on the bridge (anywhere) I thankfully only had to cross it twice. And I wasn’t driving so I got to close my eyes. But even to just look at it as you drive toward it (side view) is enough to make me turn around if I was driving.
    This site has apicture of the bridge.
    http://www.coronado.ca.us/bridge.html
    I can look at pictures of bridges but not damns. Weird. I wonder if there is a way to overcome this fear or if it is something that we just have to deal with?

  103. It has been awhile since I have been to this site.
    The list of bridges you are provideing helps to know where to avoid when I travel LOL 🙂

    I use to live in San Diego. The Coronado Bay bridge is to be avoided if you can Not only is it high and has low rails along the side but it curves and tilts as you go over it. My greatest fear was getting stuck in traffic and being on the bridge (anywhere) I thankfully only had to cross it twice. And I wasn’t driving so I got to close my eyes. But even to just look at it as you drive toward it (side view) is enough to make me turn around if I was driving.
    This site has apicture of the bridge.
    http://www.coronado.ca.us/bridge.html
    I can look at pictures of bridges but not damns. Weird. I wonder if there is a way to overcome this fear or if it is something that we just have to deal with?

  104. Wow-I can’t believe I stumbled onto this page. I did not realize that so many others had this fear. Many of them are quite similar to my own – an especial fear of bridges, over water, with high peaks (suspension bridges and the like). Originally from Michigan, the Mackinac bridge is my real nemesis, including recurring nightmares. It’s gotten worse with age- in school (Mich Tech) I took it regularly to visit with my family without a bother. They do have a service (free, apparently) that will drive you over that bridge.
    One thing I found helps – for really bad bridges I lower the visor and put towels in the side windows so I cannot ‘see out’ on the sides. It makes it feel like driving in a tunnel, which I have no problem with. If my wife is with me though, she will take the wheel if comfortable. I stuck her once with handling the Chesapeake Bay bridge/tunnel, not realizing that there were two tunnels, which she doesn’t like! And no place to pull over for me to take over the tunnels. Not to mention one lane each way, and no barrier!

  105. Wow-I can’t believe I stumbled onto this page. I did not realize that so many others had this fear. Many of them are quite similar to my own – an especial fear of bridges, over water, with high peaks (suspension bridges and the like). Originally from Michigan, the Mackinac bridge is my real nemesis, including recurring nightmares. It’s gotten worse with age- in school (Mich Tech) I took it regularly to visit with my family without a bother. They do have a service (free, apparently) that will drive you over that bridge.
    One thing I found helps – for really bad bridges I lower the visor and put towels in the side windows so I cannot ‘see out’ on the sides. It makes it feel like driving in a tunnel, which I have no problem with. If my wife is with me though, she will take the wheel if comfortable. I stuck her once with handling the Chesapeake Bay bridge/tunnel, not realizing that there were two tunnels, which she doesn’t like! And no place to pull over for me to take over the tunnels. Not to mention one lane each way, and no barrier!

  106. Hi, I also have a fear of bridges and it has now developed into overpasses as well. Doe’s anyone now of any thing that can help? I am really tired of this and I think in somes way it is self inflicted as far as ego and such. Thank you

  107. Hi, I also have a fear of bridges and it has now developed into overpasses as well. Doe’s anyone now of any thing that can help? I am really tired of this and I think in somes way it is self inflicted as far as ego and such. Thank you

  108. wow. it’s a huge relief to know that i’m not alone in my phobia of bridges. i live in Chicago and the big bridge that runs along Michigan Avenue is one of those that open up in the middle so the boats can pass thru. i have had numerous nightmares about walking across the damn thing just as it is opening up and i’m hanging on scared shitless and screaming for my life. it aint so bad when i’m riding the bus across, but walking alone, i break out in a cold sweat, my heart races and if a heavy vehicle rumbles across the bridge, and i feel the bridge “give” it only increases my terror and i scurry across it in a hurry. i also dont like being on the “L” (elevated trains) when it’s crossing over water. i cant stand to look because i’m scared the train will derail and fall into the Chicago River, where i will drown because i cannot swim.

    now that i know my phobia has a name (gephyraphobia) perhaps with the meds i take for depression, panic/anxiety and PTSD, they will help also in the bridge phobia.

    i also have a fear of going down escalators…i wonder what that’s called? i can go up but i panic when i have to go down.

  109. wow. it’s a huge relief to know that i’m not alone in my phobia of bridges. i live in Chicago and the big bridge that runs along Michigan Avenue is one of those that open up in the middle so the boats can pass thru. i have had numerous nightmares about walking across the damn thing just as it is opening up and i’m hanging on scared shitless and screaming for my life. it aint so bad when i’m riding the bus across, but walking alone, i break out in a cold sweat, my heart races and if a heavy vehicle rumbles across the bridge, and i feel the bridge “give” it only increases my terror and i scurry across it in a hurry. i also dont like being on the “L” (elevated trains) when it’s crossing over water. i cant stand to look because i’m scared the train will derail and fall into the Chicago River, where i will drown because i cannot swim.

    now that i know my phobia has a name (gephyraphobia) perhaps with the meds i take for depression, panic/anxiety and PTSD, they will help also in the bridge phobia.

    i also have a fear of going down escalators…i wonder what that’s called? i can go up but i panic when i have to go down.

  110. Hi, it’s been a while since anyone posted anything on this subject, but it’s new for me. On the way home from South Dakota last week (to Wisconsin) we had to cross the Missouri River on a long bridge. I was driving and I literally could not keep going. It was one lane only, one direction, and there was no car ahead of me, and I just couldn’t shake the feeling that I would swerve and go off the edge. I had to actually stop, right on the bridge, with cars behind honking their horns, and switch seats with my husband so he could drive us over. I was shaking and gasping for breath. I’m in my 50s and have never had a panic attack before. I have never liked bridges and tunnels before, but I’ve always managed to lock my eyes on the car in front of me and make it through. This time, with no “lead car”, I could not do it. I felt just terrible and now I worry what will happen next time. I could have caused a terrible accident. I’m fine with short bridges but the long span just freaked me out. I thought I must be the only person who had ever done such a thing but now I see there are others. Thanks for being out there and being honest.

  111. Hi, it’s been a while since anyone posted anything on this subject, but it’s new for me. On the way home from South Dakota last week (to Wisconsin) we had to cross the Missouri River on a long bridge. I was driving and I literally could not keep going. It was one lane only, one direction, and there was no car ahead of me, and I just couldn’t shake the feeling that I would swerve and go off the edge. I had to actually stop, right on the bridge, with cars behind honking their horns, and switch seats with my husband so he could drive us over. I was shaking and gasping for breath. I’m in my 50s and have never had a panic attack before. I have never liked bridges and tunnels before, but I’ve always managed to lock my eyes on the car in front of me and make it through. This time, with no “lead car”, I could not do it. I felt just terrible and now I worry what will happen next time. I could have caused a terrible accident. I’m fine with short bridges but the long span just freaked me out. I thought I must be the only person who had ever done such a thing but now I see there are others. Thanks for being out there and being honest.

  112. I am so so glad to find this site…although it has a couple of years range I see someone just posted in August 2006 so I guess people are going on it to read about this horrible situation.

    For me it is getting worse. My main problem is that I live in Virginia and love to go to the Jersey Shroe but I have to cross the Delaware River over the Delaware Memorial Bridge…I have been doing this for years but lately it is horrible..I just was at the shore in August and drove by myself…going over was not too bad but coming back it was a nightmare…I do not know how I made it over that bridge and I vow to get some type of treatment or find a route that is better for me.

    Once I crossed over the bridge on the way home then I had a terrible time on the Millard Tydings Bridge which is almost nothing and then the new Wilson Bridge Span just outside of Washington DC.

    Last year while going from my Aunts house in Glassbor New Jersey to see my cousin in the Lancaster Pa area we crossed a bridge and it was the worst experience in my life…as I got onto the bridge I could feel myself losing control and it felt like I had tremors in my brain..I thought I would never get over the bridge and it took a long time for these tremors in my brain to stop…I had that same experience this time going back across the Delaware Memorial Bridge and it si so bad.

    I am wondering if there is any long term effect of this kind of fear on a person…I know that once you get over the bridge and on land that you can regain yourself but I wish I could understand what happens.

    Therefore I am surfing the net to try to understand…I want to be able to cross these bridges…for years it wa not too bad but now just the thought of it strikes fear in my heart.

    Anyhow, my e mail is pjbernazzani@aol.com if anyone wants to send me some tips…

    Patti Bernazzani – Alexandria Virginia

  113. I am so so glad to find this site…although it has a couple of years range I see someone just posted in August 2006 so I guess people are going on it to read about this horrible situation.

    For me it is getting worse. My main problem is that I live in Virginia and love to go to the Jersey Shroe but I have to cross the Delaware River over the Delaware Memorial Bridge…I have been doing this for years but lately it is horrible..I just was at the shore in August and drove by myself…going over was not too bad but coming back it was a nightmare…I do not know how I made it over that bridge and I vow to get some type of treatment or find a route that is better for me.

    Once I crossed over the bridge on the way home then I had a terrible time on the Millard Tydings Bridge which is almost nothing and then the new Wilson Bridge Span just outside of Washington DC.

    Last year while going from my Aunts house in Glassbor New Jersey to see my cousin in the Lancaster Pa area we crossed a bridge and it was the worst experience in my life…as I got onto the bridge I could feel myself losing control and it felt like I had tremors in my brain..I thought I would never get over the bridge and it took a long time for these tremors in my brain to stop…I had that same experience this time going back across the Delaware Memorial Bridge and it si so bad.

    I am wondering if there is any long term effect of this kind of fear on a person…I know that once you get over the bridge and on land that you can regain yourself but I wish I could understand what happens.

    Therefore I am surfing the net to try to understand…I want to be able to cross these bridges…for years it wa not too bad but now just the thought of it strikes fear in my heart.

    Anyhow, my e mail is pjbernazzani@aol.com if anyone wants to send me some tips…

    Patti Bernazzani – Alexandria Virginia

  114. There was a time, I wasn’t afraid of bridges. Then I had to cross the Chesapeake Bay bridge, I discovered I had a fear of that bridge – and that bridge only. That was about 17 years ago. I am in my late 30’s now, and bridges where I had no problems crossing have become quite difficult for me to manuever. More recently, in the last few months, I have discovered that I am terrrified of nearly all bridges. I didn’t approach these bridges with the pretence that I would be afraid of them, as I have crossed them many times before. The feeling of the uncontrollable need to stop the vehicle wherever I am, to my knuckles turning white, drinched in perspiration, and I cannot listen or respond to conversation are some of the negative impact to me. When others are in the vehicle, I am either riduled to absolutely no understanding to this fear. Long trips are no fun at all. If the route is one I have driven and is known to have a bridge or more that will terrorize me, I begin to feel ill. The sign on the road will read, “whatevername bridge 40 miles” and I begin to break down mentally, as if the bridge is currently under me. I have gone as far as reasearch the bridges that frighten me and I will have to cross. I look at the bridges profile, construction date, height, and have convinced myself that there (in many cases) is no reason to fear that approaching bridge. My apartment is more elevated than many of the bridges, and my balcony does not bother me in the least. However, when I see that bridge, even after all that logic is applied, and the added logic that I wasn’t afraid of that bridge in the past, I become terrified anyway. Recently, I took a 40 mile detour to avoid a bridge, it too ended up having a bridge. The terror was that this new up and coming bridge is an unknown to me. The other, I at least understood how and to what extent I would fear that bridge. The added unknown added to the already deabilitating feeling that had taken over me. The bridge, using logic is 1 1/2 miles shorter than the 2+ mile bridge I was avoiding. It couldn’t be that bad, and it wasn’t – but still bad to me. I have trip scheduled in 4+ months, I know the path to that destination will contain all the bridges I hate, and for that I am already stressing over the trip. Remember, “whateverthename Bridge next 40 miles”. Writing about this somehow, didn’t help. I am stressed even thinking to this subject. I hope that each of you will overcome this!

  115. There was a time, I wasn’t afraid of bridges. Then I had to cross the Chesapeake Bay bridge, I discovered I had a fear of that bridge – and that bridge only. That was about 17 years ago. I am in my late 30’s now, and bridges where I had no problems crossing have become quite difficult for me to manuever. More recently, in the last few months, I have discovered that I am terrrified of nearly all bridges. I didn’t approach these bridges with the pretence that I would be afraid of them, as I have crossed them many times before. The feeling of the uncontrollable need to stop the vehicle wherever I am, to my knuckles turning white, drinched in perspiration, and I cannot listen or respond to conversation are some of the negative impact to me. When others are in the vehicle, I am either riduled to absolutely no understanding to this fear. Long trips are no fun at all. If the route is one I have driven and is known to have a bridge or more that will terrorize me, I begin to feel ill. The sign on the road will read, “whatevername bridge 40 miles” and I begin to break down mentally, as if the bridge is currently under me. I have gone as far as reasearch the bridges that frighten me and I will have to cross. I look at the bridges profile, construction date, height, and have convinced myself that there (in many cases) is no reason to fear that approaching bridge. My apartment is more elevated than many of the bridges, and my balcony does not bother me in the least. However, when I see that bridge, even after all that logic is applied, and the added logic that I wasn’t afraid of that bridge in the past, I become terrified anyway. Recently, I took a 40 mile detour to avoid a bridge, it too ended up having a bridge. The terror was that this new up and coming bridge is an unknown to me. The other, I at least understood how and to what extent I would fear that bridge. The added unknown added to the already deabilitating feeling that had taken over me. The bridge, using logic is 1 1/2 miles shorter than the 2+ mile bridge I was avoiding. It couldn’t be that bad, and it wasn’t – but still bad to me. I have trip scheduled in 4+ months, I know the path to that destination will contain all the bridges I hate, and for that I am already stressing over the trip. Remember, “whateverthename Bridge next 40 miles”. Writing about this somehow, didn’t help. I am stressed even thinking to this subject. I hope that each of you will overcome this!

  116. I've just discovered within the past few months that I have a fear of walking across bridges. I guess it was one day this past September, I left my car at home and decided to walk to the convenience store. There is an overpass that spans I-85 below. I stepped on the bridge, and started thinking what if I fell into the path of cars below. I panicked, and walked briskly across the bridge, and was breathing a bit heavily when I got on the other side. Same thing happened on the way back. I laughed at myself, and decided I wasn't going to walk to the store anymore.

    Fast forward to this week. My car gave out on me, so I have to catch the bus from work. To walk to the bus stop, I have to cross a higher overpass overlooking I-485. I have to run across it, and I have a dizzy feeling as if I'm going to fall. I do everything I can not to look down, because I'd fall for sure if I did that, in my mind that is.

    Gephyrophobia…yep, there's a name for it according to Google. Good luck to all you guys.

    Paul

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